• How To Build a Killer Baseball Collection: Scouting the Minors With Dave Bloomer Like most people my age, when I was growing up, baseball memorabilia meant baseball cards. The great thing about baseball cards at that time was that there was only one company, Topps, so not only could you collect, you also stood a good chance of getting all the cards that were available. Most people who have collections want to be able to see the light at the end of the tunnel. So, as an 8-ye…
  • 19th-Century Photographs, from Daguerreotypes to Cartes de Visites I’ve always been interested in antiques. As a kid, I collected a variety of stuff – fossils, rocks, minerals, natural history stuff, Indian artifacts and antiques. I grew up in Louisville, Kentucky, and my mother had a lot of Victorian antiques. We lived in an old Victorian neighborhood, one of Louisville’s old traditional neighborhoods. In the 1910s and ’20s it had been very vibrant, but started …
  • Daile Kaplan of Swann Auction Galleries on Collecting 20th Century Photographs Swann, which is New York City’s oldest specialty auction house, was founded in the late 1940s as an antiquarian book house. In the mid-1970s, as popular interest in photography became more widespread, the specialist at that time realized that Swann should have sales that featured documentary and fine art photography as well as albums and photobooks. Until that time, auctions dedicated to photograp…
  • The Secrets of Collecting Baseball, From Cards to Signed Bats and Balls I played baseball, basketball, and ran track from the time I was eight years old all the way through high school. Like the other kids in my neighborhood, I also grew up collecting baseball cards. I’d get an extra 5 cents and run down to the liquor store to buy packs of 25 or 30. Unfortunately, my mother threw out my cards before I was even in high school. That’s what makes baseball cards so valuab…
  • From Ambrotypes to Stereoviews, 150 Years of Photographs We both come from families that had collections and we both had collections as children. Jack lost his when his grandmother threw them out at one point. His grandmother collected china and glass. My parents had collections. When we married, we had both studied photography. In Chicago, we hardly ever saw any photographs. We went to antique shops and we prowled around in flea markets and the malls, …
  • Hitting a Home Run with Baseball Cards I started collecting in 1986. If you’re in Boston and you’re a baseball fan, the Red Sox may take over your life. They take over your life in a way that other teams don’t. With the Red Sox, I was so used to everything being terrible. They’d get your hopes up and then they crush your will to live. So collecting cards grew from that appreciation. It became an easy way for me to harness OCD and my lo…
  • Now Batting, National Baseball Hall of Fame Curator Tom Shieber The Baseball Hall of Fame officially opened in 1939, so we’re coming up on our 70th anniversary. If you include baseball cards, we have hundreds of thousands of artifacts. We have almost any artifact you can imagine and many more that you couldn’t imagine that help tell the story of the history of baseball and its importance in American culture. Baseball evolved from other sports. There’s no in…
  • 19th-Century Tobacco Cards Dave Campbell contacted me after reading a post on The Baseball Card blog. He's been collecting baseball cards non-stop since 1981. He has recently created a collection of 19th century Allen & Ginter cards. I talked with him at length about how he got interested in these cards and what it took to assemble the collection. : What prompted you to begin collecting 1880's Allen & Ginter card…