The Capodimonte (also spelled Capo-di-Monte or Capo di Monte) porcelain factory was founded in Naples in 1743 at the instigation of Maria Amalia of Saxony, who in 1759 would become the Queen of Spain. Maria Amalia was the granddaughter of the founder of the Meissen porcelain factory, so the figurines that were produced by Capodimonte were initially soft-paste-porcelain knockoffs of that style, whose icy white surfaces seemed to be covered with still-wet glaze. In 1867, the Capodimonte franchise, as it were, was awarded to Alfonso Majello, whose family continues to produce figurines of sentimental angels, hobos and drunks, and women wearing wedding-cake-like gowns.


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V&A Porcelain Figures

V&A Porcelain Figures

The Victoria and Albert Museum’s online collection of Meissen porcelain figures includes more than 150 pieces, in… [read review or visit site]