In the mid-19th-century, G.F. Hetsch, the artistic director of Royal Copenhagen, reportedly produced bisque porcelain characters such as Venus to complement his vases and candlesticks. But the first Royal Copenhagen figurines were not put on public display until the Paris World Fair of 1889. In fact, the Art Nouveau era was a particularly good time for both the firm and fans of figurines, as Royal Copenhagen designers created scores of adorable children and animals, as well as mythical figures such as satyrs.

Royal Copenhagen designers at the beginning of the 20th century included Knud Kyhn and Gerhard Henning, who, between them, created many of the company’s most enduring figurines, from polar bears and monkeys to mischievous Pan characters. Another designer from this period was Felix Nylund, whose white porcelain figure of a mother clutching her child stood a full 21 inches tall.

One of the secrets to Royal Copenhagen’s success was its underglazing techniques, which allowed artists to use color to accentuate the shapes of the figures from within, rather than simply applying color to the object’s surface. Royal Copenhagen’s product lines using these underglazing technique were quickly copied by Royal Doulton and others.


Best of the Web (“Hall of Fame”)

V&A Porcelain Figures

V&A Porcelain Figures

The Victoria and Albert Museum’s online collection of Meissen porcelain figures includes more than 150 pieces, in… [read review or visit site]



Most watched eBay auctions