• How We Used to Give Thanks in Wartime Earlier this month, while browsing the Library of Congress website for Armistice Day images, we came across this provocatively titled 1918 lithograph, created by an artist named A. Hendee and printed by Edwards & Deutsch of Chicago for the United States Food Administration. That agency was established in August of 1917 by the Food and Fuel Control Act, which was designed to, among other things…
  • Women and Children: The Secret Weapons of World War I Propaganda Posters Armistice Day is a time to reflect upon that defining moment at the end of World War I, at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, when soldiers stopped shooting at each other along Europe's Western Front. At its close, most observers assumed that nothing would ever match the "Great War" for its sheer volumes of death and destruction, and for decades after, people around the world stopped whatever they were…
  • Devils, Doves, and World War I: The Rock-n-Roll Posters of Gary Houston My dad liked Charlie Russell, the Western artist, so we had a few of his prints around the house. I always drew, even as a little kid, and I remember enjoying the way Charlie Russell signed his name next to that little buffalo skull. I don't know if that made a heavy-duty impression on my work, but I know I liked it. He was also a member of a barbershop quartet, which I always thought was a…
  • Poster Designer David Lance Goines Speaks I don’t collect posters. I don’t collect anything. I started making posters one at a time by hand in high school just for specific events, basically got going when I was a freshman. I still make them today, but they’re printed on a printing press now. I’ve made 221 posters, not including the ones I did in high school. Fundamentally, I believe that in order to be effective as opposed to artsy and n…
  • War and Prosthetics: How Veterans Fought for the Perfect Artificial Limb There's something undeniably beautiful about prosthetic limbs, designed to echo the physical grace and mechanical engineering of the human body. For most people, these objects elicit some combination of squeamish discomfort and utmost respect. But far fewer of us connect those feelings to the untold generations of battle-scarred amputees whose sacrifices made prosthetics a public priority. "Pat…