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Sharks Teeth I've Found Locally

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Posted 3 years ago

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bahamaboy
(225 items)

I remember exactly how old I was when I found this big tooth. I was in 5th grade and the year was 1965. Having lived in Florida most of my life, the ocean, along with the Saint Johns river (especially within 4 or 5 miles of the mouth where it dumps into the Atlantic ocean) hold millions of teeth that are millions of years old. I have a collection of various size sharks teeth that number in the thousands. There is a large island (called Buck Island) that is not only walking distance from where I live now, but was very close to where I lived in the 1960's. The reason for all the teeth at this location is, it's where all the spoil from past dredging of the river is deposited. Most of the larger teeth are broken and/or chipped as they flow through the 2 foot in diameter dredge pipe that is sucking up the pre blasted bottom of the river and then follows this "sometimes" half mile of pipe before it is then blown out onto the island. Every 4-6 years more dredging is done in order to keep the depth of the river at 45-50 feet. The teeth in pic two are just some other larger examples of what can be found a half mile from where I live now. (pic one just happens to be my biggest that is almost perfect condition. I have others that had they been "whole" they would have been larger by a great deal) My boys and I go down there at least once a month to the island (which has a little bridge to get across) which is closed to the public and if you want to access it, you have to know how to get over the fence. We look for teeth about every forth or fifth trip down there, as there are many other things to do, such as fishing or swimming or climbing trees. I have an extensive "fossil" collection as well because everything that use to be on the bottom of the river, is now laying on top of the ground. The reason for so many sharks teeth is because sharks back then as well as today, often come up into the river to die when that time comes. Their bodies decay and thus many many thousands & millions of teeth for the past many many years.

Comments

  1. Savoychina1 Savoychina1, 3 years ago
    come on now, tell the truth...a shark lost it's tooth and put it under its pillow and you left it a nickel ! You are like the shark tooth fairy ! lol
  2. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    That was cute Savoychina1. Real cute. I have these teeth stashed everywhere but only found one mason jar about 3/4 full. I have about 3 or 4 stashes of them but where, I don't know. But even just counting this one partial jar, there has to be well over a thousand. And if I could get a nickel for each one, I'd have a huge pile of nickels. Each day we would go out looking for teeth we would have a friendly contest to see who could find the most. It was usually my daughter (now 26 & living in NY) or myself taking top prize and the total for the day would always be in excess of a hundred teeth found. Sometimes it would total close to 200. Several times it went over that amount. Anyway I wish I had the total of all of them sitting in one pile, just to see what it would look like. If I did what you say, I'd need to have the money of Donald Trump to pull it off. So no, I'm not the shark tooth fairy, contrary to popular belief. But it sure did sound good. Thanks for looking and thank you for the comment. Also thank you on behalf of myself and all of those you are constantly helping with their items by providing them with very informative links to further identify their things. That shows a very un-selfish interest in these hobbies we all hold so dear. Thanks again, Kerry
  3. Savoychina1 Savoychina1, 3 years ago
    Thanks, Kerry, I appreciate your kind words. This has been a awesome site for me. From the newbies to the pro's there is so much to learn.

    With that many sharks teeth you have the beginning of a cottage industry. Get you some 3" x 5" boxes. Have it printed to look like the back pocket of a pair of jeans. Call it "My back Pocket". Put in a sharks tooth, some marbles, some string (could be a shoelace), a plastic frog, a couple of cool rocks, an arrowhead, a wheat penny and a piece of flint and you have a
    Little Boys Beginning Collectors Kit" ! Every boy should have one ! (You could sell them at Cracker Barrel ! LOL
  4. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    Great idea! Now all I need is an extra 3-4 hours in the day... But seriously, I could see most every grandparent that "checks-out" at Cracker Barrel buy one for the "grand-kids". Thinking back to childhood, and those of us that have stayed in touch, almost all collect at least a couple of things. I haven't met anyone that has the problem like I do, but still, that collecting spirit is nearly always hovering nearby. Thanks for being there for all of us here. We appreciate it.
  5. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    Thanks BOGIE262 for the info on the spot. The ones there didn't have to be "bounced" through a steel pipe for a half mile, banging all the way down the pipe. And like you said, the big ones bring the big bucks. The "great white's of old deposited many teeth across the ocean bottoms for millions of years. You know there has to be some perfect "monster teeth" out there. Thanks for taking the time to take a peek and thank you very much for your comment. I have a feeling that your spot in Venice will undoubtedly become more crowded as the word spreads. Thanks again...
  6. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    I live in the big city of N.E. Florida and we are a "stopping off" point on their (the "snowbirds) way down to the real Florida. Where we're at, is really Georgia, they just put the state line in the wrong place. lol There are so many teeth here and down there and with each small storm more are being uncovered daily. Up here you can go out and find a hundred and then whenever it rains, another couple hundred show themselves. I'm going to get the one jar I know of and take a shot and put it in pic 3's slot.
  7. GuardCat791, 3 years ago
    I used to hunt for shark teeth at Englewood Beach back in the early 70's but was never lucky enough to find any Mega only little ones. Awesome collection, I'm just glad that the Mega sharks aren't out there to ruin my day!
  8. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    They're still out there at 20 feet but just not the 50 foot monsters. Thank you for looking and thank you for your comment GuardCat791.

    And WOW! Sharks teeth in Kansas?? There is a whole lot more to this earth than I know about. Neat fact AR8Jason Also P.S. Prehistoric "shark fights" every Thursday eve at dusk. $5 admission at the shoreline.
  9. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    Yes the Indian ocean. And from Indonesia all the way west, to the coast of south Africa. The whole area even north to India is notorious for the man eating Great Whites, Mako's and Tiger sharks. I sure would hate to be in the waters there for any length of time, no matter how brief. Whewww
  10. beau5278 beau5278, 3 years ago
    I spent a week with a friend on a beach just north of Myrtle Beach about 12 or 14 years ago,we hunted sharks teeth most of the week in the mornings,we did pretty good,I'd like to get back and try it again sometime.While we were there we went into Myrtle Beach one day and one of the shops had some huge teeth on display that they said were found on the beach there after some dredging.If I remember correctly,they said the black ones are fossils and probably thousands of years old.
  11. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    He was right. There are many like the big one I have above that may go back closer to a million years ago. It's a pile of fun out hunting these teeth, that is if one is finding them. The dredging is the key thing as they're literally laying all over the bottom of the ocean floor and all the way down through the many inches and feet of ocean or river flooring sand or silt.
  12. beau5278 beau5278, 3 years ago
    I remember having a hard time spotting them the first day or 2,she was picking them up left and right.The ones we found came in with the tide,just small ones maybe 1/2-3/4" but your right,it was a blast,I've always wanted to get back and try it again.
  13. bahamaboy bahamaboy, 3 years ago
    The major tip for any sharks tooth hunter is once you start looking, you have to ignore everything and only focus your eyes on all things black. Once I trained myself and the kids to do this one thing, no tooth would slip by you. If you walked slowly enough, and focused on all black objects, you're a pro in no time. And because the fact that 99% of the teeth are an inch long or smaller, one needs to walk the beach or the sand slightly bent over looking like you lost something. "Sharks Tooth Scavenging" Lesson-one is now over.

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