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DUTCH/DELFT POLYCHROME TILES (ca 17th century)

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Posted 3 years ago

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Hi, I am Chaz Watson. Today is the first of a weekly series of Antiques and Collectibles - unique ideals
Interior decorating and interior design can be fun. But, one shouldn't limit oneself to antiques and collectibles alone. Because, antiques and collectibles are few and far in between. In fact, antiques has been sought after and very much replaced with reproduction since mid 17th century. In some cases they were made as good or better than the original. That being the case , feel free to replace the true antiques with reproductions when warranted.
Today's topic we will attempt explore the "DELFT TILES"
Man have been making objects of clay for many thousands of years.
In the Middle-East, about 1000-600 before Christ, tin-glaze was used.
It is understandable that the first tiles made in the Northern-Netherlands bear much resemblance to those who are made in the southern part of the Low Countries. After some time, about 1600, they begin to show a character which is more genuinely Dutch even if still polychrome. The ornamental pattern of the tile is gradually disappearing. From about 1620 the well-known blue tiles appeared beside the polychrome ones. On blue tiles, the pattern is painted in blue on the opaque white tin-glaze sub-layer. The "Delft blue" became world famous, to such an extend that it became the general name for all earthenware objects and tiles which were painted in the same blue color, even if they not had been made in Delft. "Delft blue" is known all over the world.

With prosperity in general on the increase, tiles became to be more in demand. They found ample application in houses, such as round chimney places, in corridors, round staircases, in kitchens and as lintels. The tiles were painted with scenes from daily life, such as men on horseback, soldiers, men and women during their work, ships, children playing, landscapes and with scenes from the Bible. The craftsmen who painted the tiles were general not accomplished artists and often used prints from famous artists as an example. The engravings by Pieter Schut (1615-1660) served as examples for the biblical scenes painted on tiles. We know of 592 different biblical scenes depicted on tiles.

The images presented today are excellent examples of 17th century Dutch polychrome tile. That's it for today I am Chaz Watson. Until we meet again may God Bless and Keep You..............

EXPORT OF TILES AND TILE-PICTURES (1650 - after 1800)
Thousands of tiles and many tile-pictures (two or more tiles together become a picture or decoration) in blue and in manganese, but also polychrome, were made to order for palaces, churches and convents in Portugal, Spain, the Azores, Brazil, France, Germany, Poland, Denmark and even Russia. These orders were mainly carried out by potters in Rotterdam, Delft, Harlingen and Makkum.

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Comments

  1. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 1 year ago
    Delightful!!! : )

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