Share your favorites on Show & Tell

An Interesting Plate

In Glassware > Indiana Glass > Show & Tell.
Glassware3279 of 4699milk glass pealized handvase with pink ruffled to trimmed purple carnival glassMy Grandmothers Beautiful Pitcher and Glasses
0
Love it
0
Like it

Add to collection

Please create an account, or Log in here

If you don't have an account, create one here.


Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate



Posted 3 years ago

Email

PKevinS
(4 items)

This is a plate my Grandma had that is very interesting. I have taken photos of the back to see if anyone might know who made this. As you can tell the front is beautiful...with red roses that are very vibrant...it looks like it might be gold leaf on the plate as well. This item had a note taped to the back that it was her gradma's. Grand Ma was born in 1918...and I don't know when her Grandmother gave it to her. If this looks familiar to anyone...I would sure appreciate some insight. Thanks Kevin

Mystery Solved

Comments

  1. Paul71 Paul71, 3 years ago
    This is known as "goofus glass" but this was not a term used when it was originally manufactured. Butler Brothers described this sort of ware as "...filled in with green and ruby with solid gold backing" This is, of course, gold paint. This technique is what was refered to by the trade as "cold painting" , meaning that the paint was not fired on and was not permanent. The reason for doing that was to obtain brighter colors. Most "Goofus Glass" dates from the early 1900s.

    Your plate was made by the Indiana Glass Company of Dunkirk, IN. I do not know when this pattern was introduced, but can tell you it was still being offered in an Indiana Glass Co. catalog dated 1932. Indiana Glass Co's patterns had rather long lives. This same pattern can also be found in large bowls, ruffled and unruffled.
  2. Paul71 Paul71, 3 years ago
    PS
    Since the paint was not fired on, it can flake off quite easily. Be very careful with it. Do not wash the plate, instead, just wipe the top surface clean. Many people remove the paint because it isn't to their liking, or because it is flaking off. I'd most definitely leave it, as this is part of the history of the piece and the decorative arts of the middle class during this time period.
  3. PKevinS, 3 years ago
    Wow...thanks so much..the information is fantastic.
  4. carlton57, 3 years ago
    My grandmother had the same plate and also a bowl. I was told she received it when she purchased "Comfort Laundry Soap" which came in bars. I'm not sure if she had to purchase a certain quantity to receive the dishes or if it came in the box of soap.

Want to post a comment?

Create an account or login in order to post a comment.