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Trench Art USMC bracelet

In Folk Art > Trench Art > Show & Tell and Costume Jewelry > Costume Jewelry Bracelets > Show & Tell.
Military and Wartime2662 of 40261864 Amoskeag Civil War RifleTrench Art Ashtray and Lighter with original box
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Posted 3 years ago

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scottvez
(683 items)

Aluminum trench art bracelets were a very popular souvenir and gift item in the Pacific theater during WW2.

USN examples are more typically encountered. The USMC bracelets are much more desirable and bring a significantly higher price.

While most are sold as being from a Japanese Zero, I believe a lot of that was just era salesmanship. During the War a bracelet from a zero would get more attention and interest, just as it does today. The aluminum could have just as easily come from a US aircraft or unused repair sheeting.

These were made in Navy shipboard shops as well as Navy and SEABEE land based shops.

This particular example bears a representation of the USMC Eagle, Globe, and Anchor. It also has "New Caledonia" on the side.

Scott

Comments

  1. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Check my other items for several other trench art bracelets.

    Scott
  2. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Thanks for looking hunter.

    Scott
  3. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Thanks for looking vetraio.

    Scott
  4. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Thanks much bellin.

    Scott
  5. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Thanks tlmbaran-- I thought that you would like this USMC bracelet!

    Scott
  6. larrytolkin, 3 years ago
    scott-these type bracelets are all recently made and not from ww2. they are poor copies of original wartime bracelets
  7. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Really-- what makes you say that?

    I have collected trench art for over 25 years and have seen modern bracelets.

    I am confident this is real, but am willing to listen to an explanation.

    Scott
  8. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Here is a similar bracelet on a WW2 militaria collectors forum and they have the same opinion as me:

    http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=75724
  9. larrytolkin, 3 years ago
    scott-the same guy who made your fake-made the one you posted. as i mentioned in another note-actual ww2 trench art was not as crude as these bracelets. they mostly have well defined machined engravings-not hand etched as poorly as these are. these type bracelets look like someone took a sharp blade and did the design imitating actual designs. actual ww2 designs are finer quality. the type of engraving is a copy of similar actual wartime engravings but does not make sense when you understand ww2 trench jewelry. vintage ww2 jewelry is more sophisticated than a plain cuff bracelet with poorly done etching. the shape of bracelet is actually too simple for ww2 trench jewelry. it is also very easy to fake. larry
  10. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    I am NOT a "trench lighter" collector, but I do collect trench art.

    I see you regularly posting that "soldiers did not make trench lighters"-- that distinction does NOT apply to trench art in general and I don't want folks here to come to that conclusion.

    Trench art during both wars was made by craftsmen-- some soldiers, some civilians. The vast majority was NOT made in trenches but was made during idle time as personal souvenirs or as items to sell.

    I have seen evidence through photographs, letters and unit histories that document soldiers, sailors and airmen actually making many of these pieces. The differences in quality will sometimes help to determine if the piece was "field made" or completed by a SEABEE in a maintenance shop.

    To draw conclusions that "ALL bracelets are jeweler engraved" or similar generalizations belies the facts.

    As with any "art" craftsmen quality and expertise will differ resulting in varying quality products.

    Scott
  11. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Interesting article about a SEABEE made souvenir:

    http://www.veteransmagazine.com/membersarea/MagazineIssues/16thmag/TheSeabees.pdf

    "Trench Art an Illustrated History" has a photograph out of a SEABEE unit history that shows part of their trench art production.

    Scott
  12. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Article on "US Army History of Arts and Crafts":

    http://worldwar3predictions.com/nice-world-war-3-predictions-photos_153.htm

    "While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, METAL TOOLING (MY caps), drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent. In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services."

    Scott
  13. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    From an online article titled "US Army Arts and Crafts History" written for a US Army MWR publication:

    "While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, METAL TOOLING (My caps), drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent. In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services."

    Scott
  14. scottvez scottvez, 3 years ago
    Thanks for looking packrat.

    Scott
  15. OleDogEaredCollector, 2 years ago
    I was under the impression that "Trench Art" was anything made by a servicemember in the field during a war? Be it First, Second, Korea, Vietnam, Middle East it doesn't matter and of course the material and tools at hand vary as does the quality of the 'artists" skill level. Am I wrong? Is there a certain skill level required to be considered? I have posted a piece from my collection that I welcome comments on. Good or bad whatever you have to say, I would like to hear it. I have it titled " USMC Canteen "
  16. Manikin Manikin, 2 years ago
    Semper Fi the Marine in this house loves this piece !
  17. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Collector-- the generally accepted definition of "Trench Art" is an item made from War refuse. It can be made from shells, bullets, aircraft parts, vehicle parts, equipment, etc... It does NOT have to be made in a trench or made by soldiers. While much of it was soldier made, civilians also made trench art.

    I would certainly classify your father's captured canteen as trench art!

    Scott
  18. OleDogEaredCollector, 2 years ago
    Scott, Thank you for clarifying. Like others that have posted on here I have misunderstood the true definition of trench art. Thank you. May I ask, You dont live or have lived in the 29 Stumps area do you?
  19. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Glad to help-- and pls share your other trench art/ souvenir items or anything related to you or your fathers service. I really like your Dad's captured canteen-- it is a great USMC souvenir!

    I don't have a 29 Palms connection-- I was an Army guy.

    Scott
  20. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks for looking manikin and majestic.

    Scott
  21. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks valentino-- if you have an interest, I have several other trench art related posts on CW.

    Scott
  22. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks tom.

    scott
  23. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks p...!

    scott

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