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antique mousetrap

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Posted 3 years ago

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RamblinHusky
(11 items)

I have been trying to empty out a storage shed that I haven't been inside of in 15 years.......this is one of the cool things that we found!

Comments

  1. packrat-place packrat-place, 3 years ago
    Yours looks like a recent copy. I believe the link below will show what the original looked like. However, yours is quite interesting.
    http://www.reading.ac.uk/merl/interface/schools/windmill/work/work_traps/work_traps_4.html
  2. RamblinHusky, 3 years ago
    It's not a copy and was also made by "Capito Original" as it is marked.....out of Germany.....thanks for commenting!
  3. packrat-place packrat-place, 3 years ago
    What I meant was that it was a recent copy of the original design by Capito. I worded that wrong.
    Sorry for the confusion.
  4. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 3 years ago
    I tend to agree with it being a copy. I doubt the original was produced using staples to fasten the parts together. It would be interesting to see the actual original beside the newer version just for the heck of it.
  5. RamblinHusky, 3 years ago
    As I said.....it is well marked as a Capito....what year it was made is not known by me. A "newer model" seems more reasonable than a copy.
  6. packrat-place packrat-place, 3 years ago
    Yours appears to be a "newer model" by Capito. Please refer to the link I provided to see what a c1900 model looked like.
    You are correct, "newer model" would have been a better word selection then "copy".
  7. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 3 years ago
    I found the original dated 1901. There were two models, a drowner and a guillotine. Both material and construction were vastly different but the same look as this one. Certainly an interesting conversation piece.
  8. eyesopen eyesopen, 3 years ago
    Hi I've clicked on the site provided by packrat but nothing came up (page error)
    Its a very cool thing, and I was wondering how it works? can you please explain.
  9. RamblinHusky, 3 years ago
    Capito Rat and Mouse Trap (From The Ironmonger, 1900)
    This advertisement clearly demonstrates the way in which the perpetual mousetrap works, described as the "Greatest Success of the Century". Bait is placed just inside the door. The rat or mouse is lured in. The weight of the mouse on the platform inside the door releases a hook that closes the door, trapping the mouse inside. As its exit has been blocked the mouse is forced onwards and upwards to the top of the trap. At the top of the trap the mouse topples into the canister of water below and drowns. However, at the top of the trap is a device connected to the front door by a wire. As the mouse falls to its death it operates the device which opens the door for the next unsuspecting mouse.
  10. eyesopen eyesopen, 3 years ago
    Lol thats awsome I just read it to the wife and she said it sounds more like a torcher chamber.
    Thanks for that, I have heard of a homemade more simple mouse trap, that consists of an open ended drum, a rock and some water,
    1st you catch a rat and put it in there on the small peice of dry rock left above the water line like an ice berg in the sea. the story go'es that they will help each other (dont know how much truth is in this) so anyway the rat yells out and more rats jump in to help, slowly but surely they begin to fight for the only dry bit in the drum and it just keeps going? Like I said I heard about it, iv never tried it out.
    Thanks again.
  11. jclegg42002, 2 years ago
    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/86064-antiques--1900-original-german-capito-r

    I had had this in my garage for 20+ years, a little wear and tear but believe it to an original? Any antique specialists have any input?

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