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Grandma's clock

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Clocks1118 of 2215another unknown please helpRare Art Deco (to the max) General Electric Model #4F58, "Lotus",1935-36
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Posted 2 years ago

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CJID
(3 items)

Hoping someone can tell me a little bit about this clock - I know my family has had it for quite a while but nobody seems to know anything about it. I have both the keys and we tested it and it works. The only problem is the pendulum arm has broken off and needs to be reattached.

I added the only picture I have currently of the clock face until I can get back over to my mom's.

The numbers on the back of the pendulum is 1839 if that means anything.

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Comments

  1. Bruce99 Bruce99, 2 years ago
    Also, it would help if you can post another, well lit photo that shows the dial (face) clearly. A photo of the movement would be nice. The photos of the stencils or paintings, while quite beautiful, are seldom very helpful in identifying a clock like yours. You can include any other information such as names, numbers and dimensions of the case in your description.
  2. Bruce99 Bruce99, 2 years ago
    All yours Kevin. Take it away! :)
  3. Bruce99 Bruce99, 2 years ago
    I may know a little bit about clocks but you know how C. W. works best. Some folks... Perhaps a list would help but that assumes visitors will take the time to read the guidelines. I think I need to chill out before I burn out. Thanks for the help Kevin!
  4. Bruce99 Bruce99, 2 years ago
    Kevin, thank you for the kind words Sir. You are the master of subtle nuance incorporating shadow, or things left unsaid, to give depth to your meaning, or emboss what you have "said". We've had this conversation and I'm getting off topic... :)

    CJID: It looks like you may have a New Haven "Waring" model. It is a 38-40" high, 11 1/2" wide Banjo Clock circa 1923.

    http://www.antiqueclockspriceguide.com/clockdetails.php?clockid=32302

    http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/7903875

    I'm not sure what "1839" on the pendulum weight means, or refers to. Assuming that it is original to the clock it certainly can not be the date of manufacture as the New Haven Clock Co. was formed in 1853. It might refer to the date that the stamped, rolled brass 30-day clock movement was *patented* by Noble Jerome (introduced in 1838). Mass production of that movement by the first president, treasurer, agent and major share holder of the New Haven Clock Co., Hiram Camp, is what made the New Haven Clock company possible. That's pure speculation on my part. It's not stamped, as one might expect for a manufacturing process. It's an embossed feature of the weight so I think it meant something to the company.

    We'll wait for the additional information from you in order to confirm or rule out that model/circa and see more of what you've mentioned.
  5. Bruce99 Bruce99, 2 years ago
    Those are all very good possibilities.

    I do not have many New Haven Clocks in my collection, and no wall clocks, so I don't have much "hands on" experience with them. I would be surprised to find out that a major American Clock manufacturing company sub-contracted such a critical part of their pendulum regulated movements though. In general, the major American Clock Manufacturers supplied components, and entire movements, they didn't buy them. If they did purchase parts, they would have been in large enough quantities to be name-brand distinctive.

    New Haven kept making Banjo Wall clocks even when they dropped all other wall clocks from their catalog in 1927.

    The Banjo was distinctly American as was the rolled brass movement. American clock makers did pay homage to historically significant names and dates, the New Haven "Williard" for example, but your possible explanations do make more sense practically speaking. There was nothing prominent about this number...

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