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Hammerhead Telegraph

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Posted 2 years ago

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billmine
(2 items)

This Hammerhead Telegraph I have just purchased in Queensland Australia- It has similarities of a Siemens Telegraph but does not have their markings on it - It does seem to have its origin from Norway due to the wording on the brass tag that is on the telegraph.
Telegraph is approx 4ft 6 inches high to top of control handle - it is 17 inches across the flat section and weighs approx 60 kg.

I do believe that it could have come from a large warship or large passenger ship and could very well be of 1940 to 1950 vintage.

I would like more information if I could please

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Comments

  1. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    It is very beautiful!
  2. billmine, 2 years ago
    Thank you for your comments - yes I am aware of what it's use is, I myself was at sea for 29 years - a large part of this time as Chief Engineer. The comment used "from a large war ship or large passenger ship" is stated in a UK web site with a photo of a similar telegraph. They also state that the hammerhead was preferred, rather than the round shape due to less breakage of the glass when the guns were fired.
  3. Chrisnp Chrisnp, 2 years ago
    I remember seeing one of these up for sale when I was a teenager. The seller said it wasn't from a war vessel because war vessels used the term "Flank Speed," which wasn't on the ships telegraph he was selling. I have no idea if the seller knew what he was talking about, or if he was only talking about American ships telegraphs.

    This is certainly an area I have no expertise it, and I'm sure the only reason I remember the conversation from so many years ago was that as a kid I was in awe of the gleaming brass telegraph and even more of buyer who came in; A famous local Seattle personality named Ivar Haglund who owned several seafood restaurants and wanted it for decor.
  4. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 2 years ago
    I was never in the Navy but glad I read this. I always wondered what these were called. Now I wonder if they still use them?? Guess I have something to look up.

    Thanks for posting it and the informed replies.
  5. billmine, 2 years ago
    Yes I have looked at that site but the one I was referring to was listed "annapolis maritime antiques.com" I do believe that this one has one central handle like like mine.
    I am actually trying to get something about the wording on the telegraph to see where it came from - Bjornstad is a town in Norway or I do believe it to be so and the other means Marine Telegraph. It does look like a Siemans Telegraph but Siemans they have not returned confirmation
  6. billmine, 2 years ago
    I have just re looked at the Trinity Site and it was not the double head telegraph that I looked at - it was a single head - this one does have the same wording - this telegraph is cheaper than the double head by about 600 pounds wirght of the double head is 145 kg whereas mine is approx 60/70 kg.
  7. billmine, 2 years ago
    Very good and I thank you - do you also know anything further - how and why is the wording as such, listed - I cannot find out anything about it other than the meaning of the last word- what I would like to know was the telegraph made in Norway under licence etc from Siemans.
    Sorry about the mix up of the UK and American articles

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