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Rocker identification?

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Rocking Chairs174 of 298My Favorit Rocking Chair!Stickley Windsor Bow Back rocking chair
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Posted 2 years ago

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jeffrey1952
(1 item)

I'm intersted in identifying this rocker. I was told that the Smithsonian once wanted this chair for display. If valuable, I'd like to donate to a museum (inherited from mother). Thanks all.

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Comments

  1. CaptJon, 2 years ago
    I cannot help exactly, but I have the same chair. In my case I believe that it has been in my family all along and that it is at least as old as the early 1900’s. My family lived in northern New England. If you hear anything please let me know and I will do likewise.
  2. zwingli, 2 years ago
    I have a VERY similar chair. The wood is darker. It has some minor carving on the top. I believe mine is a ladies rocking chair. My ancestors went from Hesse Germany, to LONDON, to Cincinnati, to southern IN. Wooden pegs into the bottom..and well it is short from the floor to the seat. ..of course they were short! Is your family English or German? My guess is the chair is 1820-1860. I too am lost!
  3. jeffrey1952, 2 years ago
    Thx for the responses. My ancestors are from England. I know the chair was handed down for many generations, possibly from the early 1800s, (or before)? Parts of my family came over in the 1700s, and more in the 1800s. That is really all I know. If I learn more, I will post the info.
  4. psnow, 1 year ago
    We have one of these that we purchased in the mid-1970's from one of the members of the Cheesborough family in Kingston, Canada. We were told it was a woman's rocking chair. It belonged to the seller's wife who was in her 80's at the time and we were told that it had belonged to her grandmother--which would take it back to the middle of the 1800's at least. The family was English so this would square with Jeffrey's information as well. The Cheesborough family was half of the Cheesborough Ponds collaboration that sold popular cold cream and vasilene creams for skin care in the last century.
  5. antiquemyself, 11 months ago
    I have one of these; the low arms were so the occupant could do needlework with no interference. My mother used it to nurse all her children. My guess is that is slightly pre-civil war, 1850's. Mine is black walnut with detailed carving at the top.
  6. Tutzie Tutzie, 3 months ago
    I also have a 'similar' caned and moderately carved rocking chair... my opinion is a Victorian rocker anywhere from mid to late 19th century, American. Uncomfortable for me to sit in as I'm 5'10, so it just a decorative piece adjacent to a Victorian fireplace.

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