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Asian Antiques2405 of 3355Japanese pot or something ?antique nippon cobalt blue ware late 1800s
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Posted 2 years ago

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oilman514
(107 items)

Have not a clue what it is or if its old or not but i liked it and bought it, If anyone has some info on this piece that would be awesome. Its marked 12 on the bottom corner and inside the lid.

Thanks,
Robert

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  1. chinablue chinablue, 2 years ago
    Hi oilman! This is a pretty piece you found. :-) I can't really tell anything much about it from the photos. I can get a general idea of how big it is, but can't tell if it's a transfer print or if it's painted. Just off the cuff, it was made after early 1891 because of the "made in china" on the bottom. (The McKinley Tariff, which took effect March 1,1891, required that all imported goods be stamped in English with their country of origin) And just from what I can see in the pictures it does look like it has a little age on it because of the discoloring of the bottom and the unglazed portions along the edges of the bottom and the rim. Also, because there is a number on both the bottom and the top, it makes me think it may be more than just a new "knock off' piece. The crazing or crackling look is suggestive of being older, but is often seen in modern pieces to evoke a more aged appearance. These days you pretty much have to have recognized maker's marks and/or a chance to see items 'live' to really get an idea as to age from any kiln marks or glaze defects if it's not an easily recognized maker or design. I wish I could tell you more, but hopefully someone will take a look and recognize it and be able to give you a better idea of its age. I love it! Good luck on your hunt for info! :-)
  2. jwendell222, 2 years ago
    Hi oilman & chinablue, to refine the dating a little: From 1891, in compliance with McKinley, China used "CHINA" only. After 1919 this was replaced by "Made in China" on all Chinese export to the US. Even if "CHINA" continued to be used for some time after, we can still assume that no marks with the full text "Made in China" is from before 1919 and more likely to be from the second WW or later.
    Best wishes, Jim
  3. chinablue chinablue, 2 years ago
    Thanks for the info, Jim! I knew that there was some issue with a different date than the date March 1,1891 I posted when it came to German, Czech and Japanese products (ie:occupied Japan) but didn't know that. Is that the same for all countries or was it just China that had to include the 'made in' at that time? I'll add this to my mental rolodex. :-)
  4. jwendell222, 2 years ago
    Hi chinablue, I have no idea how the European requirements were handled, but the Japanese worked something like this: After McKinley, Japan used the characters (kanji) for ni and hon which can be read as Nihon or Nipon, or spelled out the words. Kanji for dai (great) and zao (made) were also sometimes added: ‘Great Nipon Made’. In the year 1921 the US mandated that 'Nippon' had to be changed into the by then usual Western term 'Japan'. This held until 1941. After the war, beginning in 1946/7 and until April 1952 the requirement became ‘Occupied Japan’ or ‘Made in Occupied Japan’. Articles after 1952 reverted to ‘Japan’ or Made in Japan, All through this, articles made for home use had no such requirements. The water is muddy, but I hope this helps a little.
    Best wishes, Jim
  5. chinablue chinablue, 2 years ago
    Thanks Jim! I appreciate you taking the time to post that. :-) I thought you might be interested in this link that explains some of the oddities of markings both from Japan and Europe, especially Germany. There are conflicting things at different sites, but this one seems to be pretty good for a free site.
  6. chinablue chinablue, 2 years ago
    Oooops.. hit enter too soon! http://www.porcelainmarksandmore.com/resources/historical.php
  7. Micmac, 2 years ago
    Its mid 20th Century from probably 1953 to 1960s, nice though:)
  8. Micmac, 2 years ago
    Its a storage container probably for storing tea, but can be used to store anything.

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