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World War Two456 of 971My Fathers Military Training1943 Brodie
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Posted 2 years ago

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antiquesar…
(136 items)

This flag was in my grandparents' garage. It either was from my Great Great Grandfather's funeral or from My Great Grand Uncle's funeral. My great great grandfather died in 1947, and my great grand uncle died in 1974. If it were from my great great grand father it would have 48 stars on it, is there a way to tell how many stars it has without unfolding it? If it were from my great grand uncle it would have 50 stars.
I don't want to unfold it because it has probably been folded since the funeral. Is it true that at the graveside service they place 3 shell-casings inside the folded flag? Is there a way to date the flag based upon the way it's folded, shell-casings, etc. without unfolding it?
My great grand uncle, Bill Poulton, was in the Navy during WWII.
However... I don't know for certain that my great great grandfather, Chester, was in the military. I found his WWI draft registration card, but I don't think that means he was actually in the military.

Any help that anyone can provide will be greatly appreciated!!

Comments

  1. officialfuel officialfuel, 2 years ago
    God Bless America!

    Michael
  2. antiquesareamazing antiquesareamazing, 2 years ago
    God Bless America!!
    Thanks, Michael
  3. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Most funeral details place three shell casings in the flag to represent the three volleys fired-- I always did it at the funerals where I was part of the honor guard.

    I do not believe that it is part of the regulation (may be wrong), but I thought it was more of a tradition.

    It would be hard to tell the number of stars on a folded flag and like you, I wouldn't want to unfold the flag.

    You should be proud of your family's service.

    scott
  4. antiquesareamazing antiquesareamazing, 2 years ago
    I framed the flag. Since I found it I've been trying to find out who it was for. I'm assuming it was Uncle Bill's. He was in the Navy during WWII (I have his things because he had no children).
    My uncle has the flag from my great grandfather's funeral. I remember the 21 gun salute, but I don't know if there was anything put inside. The salute for my great grandpa's was performed through the American Legion Post, he was not a VFW member I don't believe. However his brother was, I think this must be from his funeral.
    Thanks AR8Jason & Scotvez, I thought there might be some way to tell based on the arrangement of the stars. I knew that I would never have something as neat as a 48 star flag. I'm glad to know now that it has 50 stars and who's funeral it probably was from.

    Just curious: Are there different and distinct military honors at funerals for each of the branch of the military?
    Thanks again, I'm glad to have such military buffs here to help!!
  5. antiquesareamazing antiquesareamazing, 2 years ago
    Also...
    Were flags presented to the mother or the wife? Or both? His mother and wife were both alive when he died.
  6. Chrisnp Chrisnp, 2 years ago
    Much of the ceremony can be dictated by family preference and situation. Just before I retired, we lost a young soldier in my unit. I was one of the pallbearers. In this case, she had been married less than a year. She was only 21, her husband probably not much older. Although the husband was next of kin, with everyone’s consent, the actual flag that covered her casket was presented to her mother. A second flag was then produced and presented to her husband.
    Strictly regulation? No, but when you consider it, it was probably the right thing to do.
  7. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Just to clarify on the volley fire vs. 21 GUN salute:

    The 21 gun (CANNON FIRE) is reserved for the President and Heads of State and Medal of Honor recipients and is separate from the funeral volley.

    The three volley salute is done at military funerals. It MAY consist of 21 rounds being fired (3 volleys with 7 firers) but can be less. It's origins can be traced back to the short truce during battle to care for the wounded and dead on the battlefield. Three volleys signified that the care of wounded and dead had been completed that side was ready to end the truce.

    scott

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