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Porcelain Figurines (Little Boy & Girl)

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Posted 2 years ago

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collector4…
(153 items)

Here is something I don't know anything about. These are what appear to be Porcelain/Ceramic Figurines of Little Boy & Girl, possible Austria/Germany. Very well made craftmanship. They stand 10" tall and have no marking that I can see. Someone covered over the bottom with felt (glued). These are from an estate sale. If anyone knows more about them please let me know.
They look like the Hummels, but not certain.

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Comments

  1. Manikin Manikin, 2 years ago
    These appear to be Hummel knock offs . They would be signed if original . Japan made ones often have the green felt on bottom . You can peel felt back for a mark and reglue it but I would say they do not appear to be authentic Hummels but very cute :-)
    The First Mark of Authenticity
    There are two marks of authenticity on all genuine Hummel figurines. The first is the signature of Sister Hummel on the base--a requirement in the nun's original contract with Franz Goebel, the manufacturer who discovered her after her artwork began appearing on postcards. From the time the first Hummel figurines were made in 1935, every piece has carried Sister Hummel's signature, except for those few pieces without bases.

    The Second Mark of Authenticity
    The second identifier is a Goebel or Manufaktur Rödental trademark on its underside. The actual look of the trademark has varied over the years. The earliest mark, used from 1935 through 1949, was a G superimposed over a W, underneath a crown. Then came various trademarks incorporating a bee, which, except for 11 years between 1979 and 1990, has been incorporated into the logo ever since. Pictures of each trademark are available on the official Hummel website.



    Read more: Hummel Figurine Identification | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/way_5162198_hummel-figurine-identification.html#ixzz23ityWlqL
    http://www.ehow.com/way_5162198_hummel-figurine-identification.html
  2. Manikin Manikin, 2 years ago
    I thought Japan Figures
  3. collector4evr collector4evr, 2 years ago
    Thank you all for the information that was given. I don't know anything about Hummels. They are cute little guys.
  4. collector4evr collector4evr, 2 years ago
    Manikin,
    Thank you for all the info. and time you took to explain it.
  5. Manikin Manikin, 2 years ago
    Your welcome Collector :-)
  6. collector4evr collector4evr, 2 years ago
    blunderbuss2,
    Thank you
  7. collector4evr collector4evr, 2 years ago
    BELLINS68,
    Thanks BELLINS68 for the love.
  8. collector4evr collector4evr, 2 years ago
    Deanteaks,
    Thank you

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