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hallmarks of sterling spoons

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Sterling Silver Spoons116 of 189Sterling Silver Spoons And Fork With A Stamp Of MK2 On The BacksUnigue Sterling spoons set of 5
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Posted 2 years ago

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filmnet
(455 items)

From right to left these 2 are on a Cedar Rapids spoon 24g
to left of this is A.Stowell silversmith with this hallmark 25g
to left again is a spoon titled Indiana with these 3 hallmarks 14g
Left final file is possibly Gorham am I correct? 21g
Image to right is A Stowell & Co and hallmark lion or cat with the W in the circle

Comments

  1. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! I just saw these. The first photo is not completely clear. The other photos are great to good. IT'S VERY HARD TO PHOTOGRAPH SILVER, and getting a good photo of these tiny hallmarks is so often very, very hard! I mean no offense - you are doing just GREAT.

    I've got to get back to work, but I have a few comments on the hallmark in Photo 1. It looks like a Gorham hallmark, and I'm sure it is. However, I am now troubled. I see on Sterling Flatware Fashions that Gorham flatware is rarely hallmarked. I am accustomed to using the 925-1000.com's Gorham hallmark dating chart, but began looking elsewhere after I had examined your hallmark. I had trouble identifying your hallmark. I was about to say: 'I would say that it looks very like the hallmark Gorham used from 1863-1990's but for two very remarkable differences. First, it doesn't look as if it's been rendered in intaglio ('cameo') fashion, and, second, the above referenced hallmark has two balls beneath the anchor. Then there are other smaller differences.' It appears that Gorham marked holloware well, but not usually flatware. Two charts follow. The first is for holloware, the second not specified. I can't proclaim a precise match on either, but I have no reason at all to doubt that your piece is Gorham.

    http://www.925-1000.com/Gorham_Date_Code.html

    http://www.sterlingflatwarefashions.com/Chronology/GorDtMks.html

    Now, I'd better get back to work, or I'll be troubled for another reason. : D See ya.
  2. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    3rd file from left is Whiting for sure
    Whiting Manufacturing Co.
    North Attleboro, MA; Bridgeport, CT; and Providence, RI 1866-1926
    Founded by William D. Whiting. Moved from North Attleboro to
    Bridgeport after a fire destroyed the North Attleboro factory. Acquired
    by Gorham in 1926 and then moved to Providence. Major
    manufacturer of a full line of sterling flatware, holloware, and novelties.
    The mark shown on the bottom was not used after 1896. See flatware patterns.
  3. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! I can't see the hallmark in question clearly, so let me as you if the hallmark has a "W" in a shield? If so, I confirm that it's Whiting. Actually, there were three Whiting firms in silversmithing business at the time, so I always spell out the name in full, as you did "Whiting Manufacturing Co."

    i can't see the hallmark Gorham and Whiting really clearly, but my preliminary hypothesis is WATSON COMPANY of Attleboro, MA. Here's a link to their hallmark so that you can confirm or reject it.

    http://www.925-1000.com/americansilver_W.html

    Uh, oh. I just read your show and tell description. I can't follow you at all. I will just go by the photo number.

    I can't see the top hallmark in the fourth photo. Who do you think it is?
  4. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! Please delete the posing I just made in my Comment No. 3. It has two typos that make it hard to understand. I’ve corrected the text below. But first, a question. RE the last photo – the one with two hallmarks: What are you saying in your description about these hallmarks and the related spoon/s, please? I can't decipher a thing on the top hallmark in the fourth photo. I simply can’t see well enough. Secondly, here’s the original information.

    I can't see the 'Whiting' hallmark in question clearly, so let me ask you if the hallmark has a "W" in a shield? If so, I confirm that it's Whiting. Actually, there were three Whiting firms in the silversmithing business about this time, so I always spell out the name in full, as you did "Whiting Manufacturing Co."

    http://www.925-1000.com/americansilver_W2.html

    I can't see clearly see the hallmark in the photo between the Gorham and Whiting; however, if it has a shield with a “W” in it, my preliminary hypothesis is WATSON COMPANY of Attleboro, MA. Here's a link to their hallmark so that you can confirm or reject it.

    http://www.925-1000.com/americansilver_W.html

    You mentioned A. Stowell. Here’s a hallmark for Alexander Stowell’s company, “A. STOWELL & CO.” of Boston, MA. He was active circa 1865-1904. Retailers of jewelry, silverware, and clocks. It doesn’t look like it corresponds to anything you’ve posted in this show and tell. Were you trying to tell me that he sold one of the souvenir spoons?

    http://www.925-1000.com/ax_Stowell_A.html

    Here’s a link for Avery William Stowell (1814-1844), born in Petersham, MA. He worked as a silversmith in Syracuse, NY circa 1840 to 1844.

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~silversmiths/makers/silversmiths/103112.htm

    AW Stowell was the son of Asahel Stowell (1771-1840), who was born in Petersham, MA, and died in Petersham. I see no indication in the ancestry.com database that he was a silversmith, jeweler, or that he sold either.

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~silversmiths/makers/silversmiths/103059.htm
  5. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    The hallmark in the bottom half on Photo 4 is that of Towle Silversmiths of Newburyport, MA. Still going strong today. Founded long ago, and still one of the finest American silver firms.
  6. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    The American Silversmith database on the free pages of ancestry.com lists the following jewelers with A. Stout names. I'll provide a link to the Jeweler's Index of Names so that you can see if any of them correspond to the dates you think you need for your spoons.

    Stowell, Abel (1789-1860)
    Stowell, Abel (1819-unknown)
    Stowell, Alexander (1821-1895)

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~silversmiths/makers/silversmiths/tagtwonames18.htm
  7. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    I say A. Stowell & Co and the hallmark has a W in the circle with lion to right So I think we have all 4 found.
  8. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! Are you referring to the top hallmark in the last photo? I didn't find an A. Stowell & Co. with a "W" and a lion. I don't doubt you, but could you please tell me where you found that hallmark - book or internet? Thanks. The only hallmark for an A. Stowell & Co. silversmith that I've found so far is the hallmark in the following link:

    http://www.925-1000.com/ax_Stowell_A.html
  9. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    I just put the file above with his name and hallmark on this spoon.
  10. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    This spoon by A. Stowell is beautiful the handle is so nice work possible grapes and the bowl has the old Boston City hall cut into the bowl
  11. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    OK, I think I get what you mean. On this one spoon you have a hallmark for Whiting and also a hallmark for A. Stowell & Co. both? Then, A. Stowell & Co. would be the jeweler, and Whiting the silversmith firm.

    Wasn't there another hallmark you wanted to work on? The hallmark you deleted to post the larger photo of this new, combined Whiting/Stowell photo?
  12. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    Yes i file deleted was a closeup of the hallmark a replaced it with both his name and hallmark, Its the same spoon
  13. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Thanks, filmnet! What it the hallmark depicted in the top image of Photo 3, please?
  14. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    This top file has on left a hallmark which says 925 over 1000, the hallmark to right i cannot understand it's very small.
  15. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! Thanks to the fact that it has a "T" in it, I was able to find the hallmark. Yes, it's mighty hard to read it. I thought that the creature in the "T" was perhaps a monkey climbing, but in fact, it's a lion rampant. This is another Towle hallmark. They have quite a few. Here's a link:

    http://www.925-1000.com/americansilver_T.html
  16. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    Towle was 10 miles north of here.
  17. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! You live in an area historically blessed with an abundance of silversmiths and silver firms. Have you ever toured the Towle facilities? Are they large?
  18. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    They are gone now there is none around here now.
  19. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    If you know the history of silver in America, you must know that the company are all gone now.
  20. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Hi, filmnet! Thanks for your information and comments. I have been too busy to verify Towle locations since the 2004 publication of Rainwater, and I had thought that some offices/facilities might remain in your area. Sometimes firms will maintain historic sites and offer tours of their facilities. I do think that your region was blessed with an abundance of fine silversmiths and silver firms over the years, and that they are residually present still. Your area is rich in heirloom and historical silver, and in educational institutions and museums that study silver and preserve significant silver. Finally, I'd like to point out that fine artisanal silver is still being made in the USA. If you mean to indicate that the golden age of American silver production has long passed us, I agree with you. It ended long ago. As for Towle, the firm has had many challenges in the last 40 years. It is now owned by Syratech, and it is still producing silver wares. It has been asserted that the quality of Towle's wares has declined since Leonard Florence first acquired Towle in 1978, and I agree with this. Consider, for example, Towle's "Old Colonial" pattern. If I were seeking to acquire a wardrobe in this pattern, I'd seek an antique, very lightly-used wardrobe from a dealer in fine estate silver or a reputable auction house. I'd not purchase current production. Nevertheless, Towle continues to produce fine silver wares, and hope that she will continue to flourish. There is always hope for a revival when one has a storied name and history. Ask a young bride-to-be shopping for a silver pattern whether she thinks that the Towle silver flatware that she encounters is fine, and I think that most would say that it is. Ask her grandmother, and she might say, “Yes, but it’s not what it was.”
  21. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    That's great Mikko I thought most silver was made in China now. Towle company was a river and sea here.They need water and the Merrimack River is huge and Newbury, Massachusetts is 1 mile from the sea.
  22. Hems303 Hems303, 2 years ago
    Hi filmnet; thanks for the post. Looking at the first two pictures I have a question: I am "new" to American marks, having rigorously focused on collecting and specialising in only English Silver, so.... what is the significance of the "Anchor" mark in your pieces? To me this means "Birmingham England", but that obviously is not applicable in this case even though the marks are identical. (Hoping to expand my knowledge onto new paths!)
  23. filmnet filmnet, 2 years ago
    http://www.925-1000.com/Gorham_Date_Code.html
    Hems this is a Gorham silver spoon look at this site, this is the one which looks the same as 4 dates, i think it the last dates fro 19 century, 1875-1900

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