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Puzzling Small Early English Redware Teapot Wedgwood?

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Wedgwood31 of 81WEDGWOOD CHINTZWEDGWOOD SET
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Posted 2 years ago

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Seagulls
(5 items)

This is one of my latest acquisitions. I couldn't resist it, although damaged. It is so sweet and I loved the handle modelled as a little hut and Chinese decoration with dragon like beasts. I have tried to research its origins but it is still a complete puzzle to me! It has a likeness to Wedgwood English Jasperware with the applied decoration and I know early Wedgwood did produce redware items. However, Wedgwood did mark almost all items so perhaps it's not even English? Unusually, it has a metal filter inside which I have not come across before. I know many people collect teapots and I am hoping someone may have come across this model or similar before. I would be most grateful for any of your opinions as I'm stumped.

Mystery Solved

Comments

  1. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 2 years ago
    Gorgeous!
  2. stubbsywubsy, 2 years ago
    i would suggest it may be Chinese, look into chinese Yixing or Zisha teapots. do you have a picture of the base?
  3. Seagulls Seagulls, 2 years ago
    Thank you stubbsywubsy for your suggestions. The base does not have any markings at all. I have since researched a little further and redware teapots were made in Staffordshire England. However, they all seem very plain and any applied decoration is in the same coloured clay. It's shape with the straight sides indicates the georgian period as earlier teapots were round in shape. I cannot find any English teapots that are similar, so I will definitely look at Chinese Yixing or Zisha teapots as suggested. Many thanks for taking the time to comment and I will keep you posted.
  4. stubbsywubsy, 2 years ago
    Hello, i was just researching yixing teapots as i have just purchased another one myself, and yours certainly is chinese and is c18th. kind regards steven
  5. Seagulls Seagulls, 2 years ago
    Hi Steven
    Yes, I have looked at Yixing teapots and you're definitely right - thank you. I had been in touch with the Potteries Museum in Staffordshire here in the UK as originally I thought it was redware. However, they too have confirmed it is definitely not English. Firstly, the colour of the clay has a burnished effect, not like English redware. Another point of interest was that the metal strainer was a European addition as the Chinese did not have strainers. I think I can definitely mark this now as puzzle solved. Thank you for sharing your knowledge, much appreciated. Considering the age of this little teapot, it has been very finely made, and a great deal of work must have gone in to the decoration which I think are Dogs of Foe.
    Best wishes from the Isle of Wight Lisa
  6. stubbsywubsy, 2 years ago
    glad to see the teapot sold well. kind regards steven
  7. Seagulls Seagulls, 2 years ago
    Thank you, we were very pleased. I must admit, I really didn't want to part with it once I had finished my research on Yixing teapots. However, it had to be sold as we have had very high winds in the UK and it will go some way to repair the hole in our leaking roof! The designs are so varied and the chinese were so skilled over 200 years ago. During my research I came across an excellent auction house Woolley & Wallis in Salisbury who had a number of past sales (2011) selling Asian items. One sale, November 2011 ?, was dedicated wholly to Yixing wares. The listing is excellent with clear photographs and for anyone interested in Yixing teapots its a super reference guide with hammer prices. I'm sure you'll find it very interesting. Thank you again for sharing your knowledge, greatly appreciated.

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