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RINDSKOPF DL LONDON 1911 PAIR

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Bohemian Art Glass2035 of 2863Bohemian? Art GlassHARRACH FLAME VASE: FINALLY, A PAIR!
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Posted 2 years ago

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Alfredo
(510 items)

1. ONLY 4" TALL. AS YOU CAN TELL, THE SILVER SHOWS CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE. ONE NEEDS TO REASSESS THIS CHEAP WAY TO MAKE CZECH PIECES MORE MARKETABLE BY ADDING THE CACHET OF A BRITISH SILVER HALLMARK.

2. THE DAVID LOEB MARK IN QUESTION.

3. A SINGLE, SHOWING THE CHARACTERISTIC RINDSKOPF STREAKED FEATHERING ON BONE ASH GLASS.

4. A VIEW OF THE BOTTOM.

NOT FOUND ON E-BAY.

A FELLOW GH EXPLAINED THAT:
1. THE HALLMARK MEANT SUITABLE FOR THE BRITISH SILVER MARKET.
2. STERLING: SUITABLE FOR EXPORT.
3. NO MARK: NON-STERLING OR MAYBE EVEN NICKEL SILVER OR TIN.

THESE BRITISH HALLMARKED CZECH PIECES ARE LIVING EXAMPLES OF THE INTRICATE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CZECH GLASS HOUSES AND THE BRITISH MARKET.

Comments

  1. inky inky, 2 years ago
    I know you can't read this at the moment, but I just wanted to let you know that you are in my thoughts and I hope you are keeping warm safe.
  2. vetrissimo, 1 year ago
    Thanks for posting this Alfredo which has identified mine.
    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/81458-rindskopf-streaky-feathered-pealescent
    Mine has a (silver ?) rim but no hallmark.
    As regards the cost & purpose of adding the silver rim, I have some views which may help. From my reading, very considerable volumes of glass were imported from Bohemia in this period, the vast majority of which was destined for the mass market. Adding silver rims allowed marketing to the higher end of the market through jewellery shops rather than general stores.
    I doubt that the cost of doing so would have been negligible so I have to argue with your use of the word "cheap". Indeed I wouldn't be surprised if it doubled the cost of the item. Bohemian manufactures were then comparatively low cost like China is today.
    You had the cost of the silver, the measuring, making and fitting of the rim (all most likely done in high-cost England) plus the cost of assay (testing + hallmark) + wholesale mark-up + retail mark-up on those extra costs.
    Judging by mine, at some point they obviously sought to cut those costs by omitting a hallmark and/or using non-silver or silver plated metal.
    Incidentally, a hallmark proves that it is Sterling quality (925/1000) solid silver but the lack of one doesn't necessarily mean it isn't. Unfortunately I do not have a silver testing kit.
    I hope this helps and that you are keeping well.
    Peter, London
  3. Alfredo Alfredo, 1 year ago
    Well, I thought relatively. A silver rim is much easier--and cheaper-- to apply than, for example, silver overlay. An from the number of Czech pieces with British hallmark rims in circulation, it appears to have been quite a common price.
  4. Alfredo Alfredo, 1 year ago
    Sorry, I meant practice!

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