Share your favorites on Show & Tell

Utamaro Japanese Woodblock Prints

In Posters and Prints > Woodblock Prints > Show & Tell.
Woodblock Prints31 of 65Suzuki Harunabu Japanese Woodblock PrintKITAGAWA UTAMARO   -   OGI-YA na HANA-OGI
9
Love it
0
Like it

PhilDavidAlexanderMorrisPhilDavidAlexanderMorris loves this.
inkyinky loves this.
miKKoChristmas11miKKoChristmas11 loves this.
ozmartyozmarty loves this.
kerry10456kerry10456 loves this.
bratjddbratjdd loves this.
MattyGMattyG loves this.
vetraio50vetraio50 loves this.
toolate2toolate2 loves this.
See 7 more
Add to collection

Please create an account, or Log in here

If you don't have an account, create one here.


Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate



Posted 1 year ago

Email

rocker-sd
(86 items)

This is a set of three Japanese Woodblock prints I picked up at a auction last week. I believe the signature is Utamaro, and the publisher is Murataya Jirobei. The format seems to be oban. I have gleaned this information from hours on the internet.
I haven't been able to translate the titles or date them. Any tips on furthe reseacrch would be appreciated. Thanks for looking!

Comments

  1. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    It is the Utamaro signature. I'll have a look around today and see if I can find the references later this morning.
  2. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    Have you seen this page?
    http://www.roningallery.com/education/
  3. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    Another resource on the net is:
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/22219182/The-Complete-Woodblock-Prints-of-Kitagawa-Utamaro-A-Descriptive-Catalogue

  4. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    The first one is from the series: "Shichi-go-san kodakara awase" and the Japanese title of this image is "Hakama-e-no-zu" or "His First Pantaloons." The Brooklyn museum has a copy in full colour. They describe it as "Dressing a Boy on the Occasion of His First Letting His Hair Grow" ca. 1795.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shichi-Go-San
  5. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    As a school teacher there's a smile I my face when I write that the Japanese see children as "kodokara" - little treasures. Utamaro also did a series called "Furyu Kodakara awase" but I can't find the third one yet. The words Utamaro and Kodokara might be fruitful google search.
  6. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    The third might be from "Kodakara Tatoe no Fushi" At least he is not being whipped as in this one:
    http://project.lib.keio.ac.jp/dg_kul/ukiyoe_artist_detail.php?id=13401
  7. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    The Brooklyn museum has a fine collection:
    http://www.mfa.org/search/collections?artist=Kitagawa%20Utamaro%20I&page=2&rows=64
  8. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    I've just had a look at the title on each one a bit more carefully. My Japanese is no where, but I do know that they all three begin the same first six characters at least. I do recognise them as being numbers too! They all begin with Shichi-go-san the characters of the numbers 7, 5 & 3. That makes me think that they are all from the se series: "Shichi-go-san kodakara awase" .
    That's as far as I have gotten so far.
  9. rocker-sd rocker-sd, 1 year ago
    vetraio50, Thank You once again! You have provided me with so many leads to follow. I never thought these three simple prints could lead me on such a chase. I am certainly gaining quite a appreciation for Japanese Woodblocks and your exstensive knowledge too!
  10. rocker-sd rocker-sd, 1 year ago
    Thanks BELLIN68, toolate2, MattyG, bratjdd, and kerry10456 for the love.

Want to post a comment?

Create an account or login in order to post a comment.