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Dome top trunk Scalloped edges

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Furniture2042 of 4595Antique Empire Cube Chair RockerCupboard- kuhne
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Posted 2 years ago

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passion4tr…
(19 items)

Found this in the Sacramento Bee Classifieds about 21 years ago. The women of the house had beautiful antiques, but the The trunk she sold me was painted black. Yes another one painted. I wanted this trunk. She wanted 50.00 bucks. I gave it to her. The trunk was mine.

Now, all I had to do was strip the paint off. You might not want to know how I did this, but I will tell you. I use a razor blade to remove the paint. It takes a steady hand and a lot of time. Then of course sand paper. This could take me a few months to finish. I love the scalloped edges and hardware. It's missing the end handles and leather bindings that wrap the trunk., But is totally solid. Including 4 caster wheels.
Still working on this. Any one know what year this might be.
26'H from bottom to the highest slat. 32"L slat to slat.

Comments

  1. trunkman trunkman, 2 years ago
    That is a gorgeous trunk. I cannot believe you scrapped off the paint with a razor blade -- wow that is some patience! It looks to be about an 1870's trunk judging by the hardware on it. Nice piece -- thanks for showing it to us. (fabulous price you paid -- great eye for what kind of trunk stands above the rest)
  2. passion4trunks passion4trunks, 2 years ago
    I had run out of money for my new passion. All I had were razor blade. When you use these thin blades you are forced to study the trunk and take you time.
    You are right. It is a great way to learn patience. Something I was lacking.
  3. trunkman trunkman, 2 years ago
    All that patience paid off. I wonder, due to the hue of this trunk, if it is made of cedar? Or if it had been covered in leather it would also have a reddish hue to it. Did you stain it after you took off the paint? Great look to it.
  4. passion4trunks passion4trunks, 2 years ago
    @ trunkman - I did not stain what I believe is oak wood. I could be wrong. I don't know what was originally covering the wood. There was no signs of canvas or leather. It is possible that the previous owner removed all of protective layer and then stained the wood.

    fter scrapping the paint off the trunk. I sanded then cleaned the wood lightly with soap & water. Then I applied tung oil and a lot of elbow grease.

    Thank you for the love
  5. trunkman trunkman, 2 years ago
    It is a great look -- but it most likely is not oak, but rather pine. Oak was an expensive wood so they would not use it only to cover it up.
  6. passion4trunks passion4trunks, 2 years ago
    You are most like correct. Thank you for the help.

  7. passion4trunks passion4trunks, 1 year ago
    officialfuel, trunkman, and BELLIN68 thank you for the love.
  8. TrunkerMarvin TrunkerMarvin, 9 months ago
    Hi, I love your trunk. That trunk was made sometime in the very early 1870's. Trunks from that time period had the leather tie down straps on the front, the fancy brass locks of that style, and some of the first cast iron slat clamp bumpers. Trunkman is correct that the wood is probably pine, or possibly basswood. The thick outer slats are often elm and sometimes oak. The trunk has a great look and I love the hardware and tack work on the trunk. The leather tie down straps didn't go across the top on these, even though you will see some "restorers" put them on that way. Enjoy your trunk!
    Marvin

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