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Early tintype made by a multiplying studio camera

In Photographs > Tintypes > Show & Tell and Cameras > Wood Cameras > Show & Tell.
Photographs1215 of 2887Civil War Union sailor on blockade duty in South CarolinaGrandmother & fallen son
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Posted 2 years ago

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rniederman
(162 items)

Years ago, a fellow collector and close friend gave me the tintype shown here. At first glance, it appears to be a commonly found studio shot of an anonymous and conservatively posed subject in front of cloth backdrop. While the majority of tintypes are singular images, many of these were actually cut from a larger sheet with multiple pictures.

The second picture reveals that the portrait is actually one of four images shot on a 5” x 7” tintype plate; in reality, two of the four pictures were found and positioned to show how they would appear relative to each other on the plate.

Tintypes are unique images that cannot be reproduced without copying; so to make cost effective ‘multiples’ a multiple lens camera was often used - in this case - a 4-lens style shown in the third image.

Comments

  1. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    A mundane image until you have the second copy (or more)-- then both become PRIZED images because of what they show!

    GREAT information and exhibit rob!

    scott
  2. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, officialfuel!
  3. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, blunderbuss2!
  4. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, mtg75!
  5. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, Scott for the 'love' and comment. I'm always looking for uncut tintypes but they are difficult to find.
  6. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    How many uncut sheets do you have?

    scott
  7. ericevans2 ericevans2, 2 years ago
    I am old enough to have had my photo taken on tintype by a street photographer with a single-lens camera when I was a child; probably about 1937? Multiple lens cameras never seem to have caught on too well in Britain.
  8. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Scott ... I used to have a couple uncut sheets but sold them years ago because they were not in good condition. A couple nicer examples have slipped through my fingers.
  9. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, miKKo!
  10. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Your posts have made me want to acquire one now!

    I will be on the lookout for a sheet or cut images from a sheet.

    scott
  11. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks walksoftly, Longings, and vetraio50!
  12. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, Phil!
  13. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, musikchoo!
  14. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, Eric (and for the comment)!
  15. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Rob-- how were the images cut apart?

    Scott
  16. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Scott--Shears (very robust scissors) were used to cut tintypes. For example, Scovill advertised "10-inch steel blades" for $1.25 per pair in 1888. Another Scovill model called "Bankers' steel blades" were listed for $1.50 to $3.00 per pair. - Rob
  17. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks rob-- that's what I assumed, but I am always amazed at the straight cuts!

    Scott
  18. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, trunkman!
  19. rniederman rniederman, 2 years ago
    Thanks, bratjdd!
  20. rniederman rniederman, 2 months ago
    Thanks, f64imager!

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