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Moore's Teat-Fire,Moore's Pat. Firearms Co.

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Outdoor Sports376 of 1337Moore's National Arms Co. .32 Teat-Fire With Hook ExtractorWife's 32 cal. Defender
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Posted 1 year ago

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pw-collector
(546 items)

Since Kevin, AR8Jason, posted his teat-fire cartridge revolver by National Firearms Co. with the swivel gate in front of the cylinder (http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/77328-cw-post-2000--moores-teat-fire-revol?in=1118), I thought I would show the other two versions of the 32 caliber teat-fire, front loading revolvers, manufactured by The Moore's & National Arms Co.
This is the first version manufactured by the Moore's Firearms Co.
The barrel is stamped: MOORE'S PAT. FIREARMS CO. BROOKLYN, N.Y.
The cylinder is marked: D. WILLIAMSON'S PATENT/JAN. 5, 1864.
It has a small hinged swivel gate on the right side or the barrel lug ahead of the cylinder.
There were an estimated 20,000 of these manufactured.
This is serial number 102xx.
The name was changed to the National Arms Co. in or around 1866, and the National Arms Co. Brooklyn, N.Y. revolver that AR8Jason showed, is one of the 2nd version models manufactured. An estimated 5,000 of these were manufactured.
http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/77328-cw-post-2000--moores-teat-fire-revol?in=1118.
In the next two post I will show the 3rd version with the "hooked extractor" and the loading process.
Thanks for looking,
Dave

Comments

  1. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Link to Kevin's 2nd version posted.
    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/77328-cw-post-2000--moores-teat-fire-revol?in=1118
    Dave
  2. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks BELLIN68, Kerry, mustangtony & blunderbuss2 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  3. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    You have been beaten on the "hook extractor"/ ejector. Now I've got this "swivel-gate" introduced & left unexplained. I'll bite. What does the swivel gate do? seat the cartridges flush with the face of the cyl.? Am understanding why I never had one in my collection.
  4. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Blunderbuss2,
    The swivel-gate & hook extractor are moved down to push the spent cartridge out of the front of the cylinder without removing the barrel. Cartridges can also be loaded from here..
    With the swivel-gate you have to use a rod, stick or some other object to push the spent cartridge out from the rear of the cylinder.
    With the hook extractor, it does it for you.
    If the design was a good one, Colt would have continued it after buying the company. Probably why it only lasted 6 years.
    Dave
  5. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    So this swivel-gate just moves back to the rear of the cyl. to eject the case? It appears to be attached to the barrel lug. Is it detached from there & moved to a place at the rear of the cyl. where it would do that job? I am having to completely reprocess this information now that what has been called an extractor is actually an ejector. At this point, I wished that I had never asked!
  6. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Blunderbuss2, Here are the 3 versions:
    The first 2 have the swivel-gate that just rotates down so the front of the cylinder is fully clear so the cartridge can be pushed forward from the small hole in the rear of the cylinder. It is not removed from the barrel lug.
    The 3rd version has the hook extractor that rotates down and while doing so, the hook on the rear end pushes the cartridge forward.
    Dave
    .32 teat-fire version 1: Moore’s Pat. Firearms Co.
    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/77605-moores-teat-firemoores-pat-firearms?in=1118

    .32 teat-fire version 2: National Firearms Co. with small swivel gate.
    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/77328-cw-post-2000--moores-teat-fire-revol?in=1118

    .32 teat-fire version 3: National Firearms Co. with “hook extractor”.
    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/77608-moores-national-arms-co--32-teat-fire?in=1118
  7. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Please explain,"the swivel gate that just rotates down so the front of the cyl is clear so the cartridge can be pushed pushed forward ---". Quite frankly, I see no reason for the "swivel-gate" except to seat the cartridges. The bolt in the action should automatically lock the cyl. in the correct position for ejecting the cases. I think the S/G is only for seating the rounds. Use the nail & hammer tied around your neck to drive out the spent rds. & hope you aren't dead before finished.
  8. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    blunderbuss2,
    I'm not a gunsmith or the inventor, so I'm not sure how else to explain it.
    If the swivel gate is in the up, locked position you cannot extract the spent cartridges without removing the barrel assembly and removing the cylinder. To bypass this process, you rotate the swivel-gate downward and the cartridges, one at a time, can be pushed forward with and object of choice, from the rear of the cylinder.
    The hook extractor is just an improved method of removing the spent cartridges.
    I have never fired these and only have the one cartridge.
    I hope this helps to explain this process,
    Dave
  9. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks Kevin for the appreciation.
    Dave
  10. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Understand it all now. I will say this, I could certainly have explained it a lot clearer and simpler. But understand it now.
  11. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks pops52, toolate2 & ttomtucker for the appreciation.
    Dave
  12. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    blunderbuss2,
    I'm sorry for the confusion I may have caused for you, but I'm glad you now see how it functions.
    At this time in history, the patent of the bored-through cylinder by Rollin White and now owned by Smith & Wesson was new to the firearm industry and until their patent expired there were a lot of copies, infringements and evasions that transpired trying to acquire part of the market. There were a lot of designs by makers to try and evade the patent rights by developing alternate cartridge ignition systems and loading designs that resulted in some very awkward firearms.
    S&W in purchasing the patent from Rollin White, paid him $0.25 for every cylinder they manufactured until the patent ran out, but with this, he was responsible to defend in court, including the expenses, any lawsuits against any infringers. Because of so many companies involved in lawsuits, Rollin White died a poor man spending all his royalties on court proceedings.
    Some of the companies that legal action was imposed because of "infringements" were:
    *Manhattan Firearms Co. .22 rimfire. A very close copy of the S&W Model 1, 1st issue.
    *E.A Prescott's early S&W style pocket & belt revolvers .32 & .22 rimfire.
    *Bacon Navy Model Revolvers .38 rimfire
    *Moore's Seven Shooter .32 rimfire.
    *Lucius W. Pond Pocket & Belt Revolvers .32 rimfire.
    *Springfield Arms Pocket Revolver .22 rimfire
    *James Warner Pocket Revolver .30 rimfire.

    Evasions:
    Some companies that invented a metallic cartridge other than a rimfire type that did not require a completely bored-through cylinder.
    *Cup-fire Front Loading System: Connecticut Arms Co. & Plant Mfg. Co.
    *Crispin cartridge system: Silas Crispin Revolver marked Smith Arms.
    *Lip-Fire System: Ethan Allen successor to Allen & Wheelock.
    *Teat-Fire System: Moore's Patent Firearms & National Arms Co.

    Another approach to evade the patent was to make a multi-part cylinder, firing a rimfire cartridge, instead of using a one-piece bored-through cylinder. These were:
    *Pond Front Loading System used cylinders with removable individual steel chambers.
    *Brooklyn Arms Slocum Front Loading Pocket Revolver used a cylinder with five individual sliding tubes which serve as the firing chambers.
    Dave


  13. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    My main problem was understanding the use of "extractor" when in gun technology it is an ejector. Kind of like diff. between effect & affect.
    Think I need to buy some new clothes. My "bag-boy" from the grocery store just bought me a beer.
  14. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks BELLIN68 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  15. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks petey for the appreciation.
    Dave
  16. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks ttomtucker for the appreciation.
    Dave
  17. pw-collector pw-collector, 11 months ago
    Thanks toracat for the appreciation.
    Dave
  18. pw-collector pw-collector, 7 months ago
    Thanks tom61375 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  19. tom61375 tom61375, 7 months ago
    You are very welcome!
  20. antigunner, 3 months ago
    I have an 1864 Moore Teat-Fire Revolver. Can someone explain how you get the barrel off or out of the way in order to load. Thanks
  21. pw-collector pw-collector, 3 months ago
    antigunner,
    The Moore Teat-Fire revolver shown above is a front-loading revolver. See photo#3 above, the small hinged swivel gate on the right side of the barrel lug ahead of the cylinder swings downward to load the cartridge, rotate cylinder to continue loading.
    Dave
  22. pw-collector pw-collector, 3 months ago
    Thanks vanskyock24 for the appreciation.
    Dave

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