Share your favorites on Show & Tell

Moser - Longships

In Art Glass > Moser Art Glass > Show & Tell and Art Deco > Show & Tell.
Art Deco897 of 19631957 Bulova JeffersonArt Deco Decanter
17
Love it
1
Like it

kivatinitzkivatinitz loves this.
SteveSSteveS loves this.
LilliflunewLilliflunew loves this.
ABQCathyABQCathy loves this.
Slave-to-glassSlave-to-glass loves this.
ozmartyozmarty loves this.
madforglass.esmadforglass.es loves this.
vetraio50vetraio50 loves this.
inkyinky loves this.
miKKoChristmas11miKKoChristmas11 loves this.
LondonloetzlearnerLondonloetzlearner loves this.
dlfd911dlfd911 loves this.
Project_HarrachProject_Harrach loves this.
AlfredoAlfredo loves this.
czechmanczechman likes this.
GreatsnowyowlGreatsnowyowl loves this.
beyemveybeyemvey loves this.
See 16 more
Add to collection

Please create an account, or Log in here

If you don't have an account, create one here.


Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate



Posted 1 year ago

Email

manddmoir
(22 items)

I have long been fascinated by the Moser longship vases, there is an example at Passau Glass Museum and - like most of the great Moser pieces at Passau - it is featured in the wonderful Jan Mergl and Lenka Pankova 'Moser 1857-1997' book. My one, the only other one I’ve seen, is much taller (around 11 inches), but otherwise quite similar.

It is quite unlike any other piece of Moser I know. Probably the reason for it was the fact that is it was designed by Gustav Moser-Millot –possibly one of the only things he ever designed for the company.

Gustav was one of Ludwig’s younger sons. Although he was quite involved with the Moser works early on, his primary role was to run the prestigious Moser shop in Paris. As well as selling Moser glassware, the shop sold other bohemian glass and oddly the works of the great G. Argy-Rousseau. In fact, around 1925 Gustav did a deal with Argy-Rousseau to make his glassware at Moser.

This series of vases was designed in 1936 to form a significant part of the Czechoslovak exhibit at the 1937 Paris Exhibition. Supposedly the rest of series depicted other classical images such as bulls and chariots. The fact that Moser was exhibiting at all at that time is pretty amazing as the ‘local’ politics were, to say the least, difficult. Around two thirds of the local population were Czech bohemians and becoming increasing nationalist – they had effectively ousted the presence of any Moser family members from the management of the Moser Company around 1934. The other third of the local population were German-Bohemians who had no liking for the Moser Family either. In fact the 1937 Paris exhibition closed around Easter 1938 only a few weeks before Germany annexed the whole area around Moser.

It does beg the question why a Moser family member ousted from the board of Moser in the early to mid 1930’s was still willing to design for them in the late 1930s. Maybe the simple fact he was already in Paris, made his involvement expedient at such a critical time. Either way, we have a wonderful and recognisably Moser piece that is unlike any other.

The vase, above, is very deeply acid etched with wonderful typical Moser Polychrome staining. According to Mergl they ship is greek. Perhaps most interestingly, on its base, is a label from Gustav’s own shop in Paris. I doubt they sold there very long –which may explain their rarity.

Enjoy!

Comments

  1. beyemvey beyemvey, 1 year ago
    Great vase and fascinatinh history... Kudos!
  2. jericho jericho, 1 year ago
    great research, wow!
  3. bohemianglassandmore bohemianglassandmore, 1 year ago
    Great write up, Mike. Beautiful vase, too!
  4. ozmarty ozmarty, 1 year ago
    Remakable vase for so many reasons ..and to still have it's orignal label intact ..
    Thank You for posting .

Want to post a comment?

Create an account or login in order to post a comment.