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OCHUMICHO 1960 CERAMIC TABLEAUS

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B: Fantasy apartment109 of 268Rug ''Amsterdam School''Ocumicho tableaus part 2
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Posted 2 years ago

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DLSHOWMYST…
(4 items)

One of my other collections consist of 30 Mexican Ochumicho ceramics depicting religious and fantastical figures doing everyday chores.

Although the clay work was engaged in only by women up until the 1960s, an unusual young man, Marcelino Vicente, began creating strange little figures of devils, monsters, and unholy scenes. Called diablitos, or “little devils,” the creatures surprised everyone by selling well in the markets. Based upon the success of these figurines, other local clay workers began to make similar items.

Some diablitos are quite simple; others consist of more complex scenes with many figures situated in groups. The devils may be found in religious settings, including at depictions of the Last Supper, and are often sexual in nature.

Marcelino’s Short Life in Ocumicho

Marcelino was a native of Ocumicho, but was orphaned at a young age, and as an adult lived alone and appeared to disdain traditional male roles. He began making clay figures at the age of 18; by 35 (in 1968) he was dead in a cantina brawl. He loved to sing and dance, but was barely tolerated by the villagers because of his unusual activities. Possibly he was gay; no one interviewed by Ms. Isaac cared to make a statement on that subject.

Marcelino gained acceptance as an artisan and a full member of the community only after his grotesque figures had become popular. He then formed a workshop of 14 friends and relations, with himself as the master teacher, or maestro. Unusual for the time, the group included both men and women. The overt sexuality of the figures they produced was even more unusual. Although the tourist markets offer angelic and religious scenes in the same style, "authentic" Marcelino figures tend to be obscene.

Pottery in Ocumicho

Both Ocumichos, as the figures are often called, and the toys and whistles also produced by artisans in the village, are low-fired ceramics baked in wood-fired kilns. Since low-fired clay produces fragile pieces, they must be handled with great care. The diablitos, toys, and pitos (whistles) are often painted with enamel paints and may be finished with a varnish. Older figurines were often painted in subdued colors. I prefer the more subdued colors of the older pieces because the newer creations are usually brightly painted and have more modern settings.

Over the years, various government agencies have developed outlets for the sale of the folk art of Ocumicho, but items can be bought from private shops locally as well as in stores in various cities in México. Some are exported to specialty shops in other countries, including the United States.

I will be changing the images every few weeks.

I hope you enjoy seeing them as much as I enjoy showing them to my visitors.

Don

Comments

  1. valentino97 valentino97, 2 years ago
    Don - this is so beautiful and thank you for telling the story. What a beautiful collection!
  2. itslisanla1, 9 months ago
    Hi Don,
    Thank you so much for sharing your wonderful treasures......fantastic eye candy!
  3. uhrensamlr, 7 months ago
    Don,
    I also collect Ocumichu.
    Do you have a website thru which I could contact you?

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