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R. HOE & COMPANY NEW YORK CITY "PRINTING PRESS" NEED YOUR HELP DECIDING WHAT TO DO ON SECOND PICTURE

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Bookplates1 of 51780 bookplate large King George III  by BartolozziGENERAL LEE DIRECTING THE BATTLE
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Posted 2 years ago

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bratjdd
(467 items)

Like to share this picture from the book of; "True Stories of Great Americans for young Americans"

Information credit to Wikipedia.
R. Hoe & Company was a New York City based printing press manufacturer established by Peter Smith, Matthew Smith (?–1822), and their brother-in-law, English emigrant Robert Hoe (1784–1833), in 1805 as Smith, Hoe & Company

The company initially specialized in the manufacture of wooden hand printing presses, but later added saw-making.[2] In 1819 the company expanded to printing presses.[4] After Smith’s death, Hoe and his sons renamed the company and worked on improving existing machinery.[2] In 1827 Hoe bought and improved a patent on wrought iron framed presses initially owned by Samuel Rust.[2]
After their father’s death, sons Richard and Robert Hoe (?–September 23, 1909) took control of the company and continued to innovate the printing process.[2] The company developed a mechanical sheet delivery system, invented and patented[5] the rotary printing press, and developed the first type revolving presses.[2] R. Hoe & Company helped facilitate the rapid and inexpensive production of newspapers.[2]
Their 1855 lithographic presses, in dimensions of 19x24 inches to 38x48 inches, sold for $165–375.[4] A six-cylinder model was able to produce 166,000 16-page newspapers per hour

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Comments

  1. walksoftly walksoftly, 2 years ago
    Great image, love the old industrial stuff.
  2. bratjdd bratjdd, 2 years ago
    Thank you, walksoftly, should i not be posting according to second picture?
    Need you opinio.
  3. walksoftly walksoftly, 2 years ago
    I don't see why not, you aren't doing it for commercial purposes & you've identified the source.
    But then I'm not a copyright lawyer... lol
  4. Chadakoin Chadakoin, 2 years ago
    If it was published before 1923 (appears it was), then it's copyright protections have expired.
  5. bratjdd bratjdd, 2 years ago
    Thank you, Thank you, mustantony, Chadakoin ,walksoftly, for your help now I feel more comfortable sharing this picture with everyone it would be ashame not to.
  6. bratjdd bratjdd, 2 years ago
    Thank you, nldionne
  7. bratjdd bratjdd, 2 years ago
    Thank you, everyone

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