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Jean Langlade French Art Nouveau Vegetal Form Stoneware Vase

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Art Nouveau - French Ceramics34 of 471903-05 Émile Decoeur Unusual Proto-Modernist Vase for L'Art CeramiqueMougin Frères (Circa 1902-04) Organic “Wave” Form Art Nouveau Gres Vase
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Posted 1 year ago

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cogito
(113 items)

Beautiful tones of green, brown, blue, purple and ochre combine spontaneously on this charming late 1890s double gourd vase by French Art Nouveau ceramist, Jean Langlade (1879-1928). The sculptural vine that wraps around the piece forms both a subtle whiplash line and a small handle, suggesting that this was meant to serve as a pitcher. Marked "Langlade" in script on the base, partially obscured by glaze.

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French ceramist Jean Langlade was likely raised in Limoges, France, but first surfaced in historical documents as a student of Bernard Palissy in Paris. Armed with a solid technical training, he settled into work at 107 rue de Charenton (Paris) with the name of “Manufacture de gres, de Charenton - Specialty sandstone bonfire, articles for moulders, earthenware and porcelain, articles of all kinds.” Langlade also appears on the 1914 tax rolls as “moulder and dealer of ceramic busts and figurines.” His oeuvre included glazed earthenware vessels, figures, and porcelain ware.

In 1920 he joined the ceramists of Saint-Amand-en-Puisaye (in central France) and hired by Arnaud in his workshop of Faubourg from about 1920 to 1922, which was highly esteemed for their high fire stoneware. He then worked with the Société des Grès Flammés in the small hamlet of La Tuilerie before establishing his own workshop in Dampierre-sous-Bouhy around 1923. Langlade had contracted tuberculosis by this time and wanted to retire to a peaceful area to recuperate and work until his untimely death in 1928. Langlade’s second wife, Angela Blanquet, took over the pottery after her husband’s death. Jean Langlade is considered the father of French flambe glazed earthenware.

Comments

  1. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    A very Japanese look to the form as all.
    Severely nice.
    Discrète!
  2. cogito cogito, 1 year ago
    Merci! Langlade was certainly influenced, as were his peers at the time, by Japonisme ceramic techniques. I've been on an organic Art Nouveau pottery binge as of late.
  3. AmphoraPottery AmphoraPottery, 1 year ago
    Wonderful personality to this vase. I love how it leans.
  4. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    Hyotan. Lagenaria siceraria. Buddha references.
    "In China one of the Eight Immortals of Taoism is Li T’ieh Kuai, whose symbol is a gourd. “From it clouds of vapour rise, denoting his power of freeing his spirit from the body to wander at will.” Often he holds it out from his body and smoke spirals upward showing his powers of releasing spirits."
    Good article here:
    http://printsofjapan.wordpress.com/2009/05/07/gourds/


  5. cogito cogito, 1 year ago
    Very cool, Vetraio50! You know how much I love backstory material. Thanks all.

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