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The Civil War & Smith & Wesson

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Military and War Books22 of 108Confederate ArmsWWII Gun Buster Books
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Posted 1 year ago

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pw-collector
(545 items)

The Civil War & Smith & Wesson.
At the time the Civil War broke out, Smith & Wesson was the only authorized American revolver manufacture that had a bored through cylinder, firing a self-contained metallic cartridge. They introduced the Model 1, a seven-shot .22 rimfire in 1857, but soon realized a growing demand for a more powerful cartridge. In June of 1861, two months after the Civil War broke out, they introduced what the factory called the Model 2, or Belt Pistol. It was a six-shot .32 rimfire caliber offered with a 6" barrel first and later in 5" as standard. Although it was never adopted or purchased by the Army, it was a popular Civil War sidearm purchased by soldiers or soon to be soldiers. Because of it's popularity, it became known as the S&W Number 2 Army. They manufactured 77,155 between 1861 to 1874, beginning with serial number 1 - 77155. Historians have recorded that the cut-off serial number for the Model 2, manufactured during the Civil War is around serial number 35731. Production records show serial numbers 29359 - 48475 were manufactured in 1865.
Although neither of the two Model 2's shown here can be definitively traced to being used in the war, both were manufactured within the Civil War time-frame.
The 1st Model 2 shown (photo 1 & 2), is serial number 1973, with a 6" barrel, manufactured in 1861. Records show serial number 1 - 2122 were manufactured in 1861. It is the early production with only two pins in the top-strap (note the two pins in the top frame above the cylinder). The two-pin variation is noted to about serial number 3647. The only major change in the Model 2 was, a third pin was added to the top-strap.
The 2nd Model 2 shown (photo #3) was given to me by my grandfather which was given to him by his father. It is serial number 31362, with a 5" barrel & the 3-pin top-strap variation. It was probably manufactured in January or February of 1865. The holster shown does not show any makers marks, but as a kid, spending a lot of time with my grandfather, he always had this Model 2, in this holster sitting on the dresser in his bedroom. A treasured gift and memory that will never be forgotten.
Photo #4 shows the 6" Model 2 on top & the 5" below.

The Books:
Yankee Rebel is the written from the personal journal of Edmund DeWitt Patterson, a northerner, born in Lorain County, Ohio, but left at the age of 17 went south to Second Creek, Alabama (just above Waterloo) to sell books. He failed as a salesman and the town needed a school teacher. He convinced the school directors to hire him temporarily until he could obtain a certificate, which he did, but at the end of the year decided he didn't want to be a school teacher like his father, so he entered the dry goods business which he liked until the late spring of 1861 when he enlisted for the war with his Waterloo friends in Company D (Lauderdale Rifles), Ninth Alabama Infantry. Thus the title, "Yankee Rebel".

Rebel Private: Front and Rear by William Fletcher. Memories of a Confederate Soldier. I haven't read this one yet.

Just a little family history I thought I would share.
Thanks for looking.
Dave

Comments

  1. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks mustangtony for the appreciation.
    Dave
  2. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks pops52 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  3. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    This is what we are talking about! Great history with background info, great story & well written & presented. Is that a holster or a leather gun case? Would love to read the books but guess they're out of print. Thanks Mon.
  4. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks BB2 for the compliments and appreciation.
    That is a leather holster lacking any makers markings. Could be home-made. I regret not asking my grandfather about the holster. He must have really liked it, because the belt loop is broken, so he tied it together with a shoe-lace so he could still use it.
    The book Yankee Rebel is available again. It first went out of print in the late 60's early 70's but then came back out in 2004. I would think it is still available. Rebel Private I got at a book sale in a local library. It was printed in 1995.
    Dave
  5. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks rniederman for the appreciation.
    Dave
  6. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks officialfuel for the appreciation.
    Dave
  7. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    BB2, both books available on Amazon.com.
    Dave
  8. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Because of where I live, cost is prohibitive because of shipping cost but will be on Uncle Sambo's Plantation for a visit in a few months so will be able to carry them back with me. Thanks for the lead.
  9. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Really do love the holster. Not a quick-draw but more of a, "Can you wait a moment" holster.
  10. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks BB2. Definitely not a quick-draw. My grandfather must not have needed a quick-draw in the old west. He lived a long life, 102 years, 5 months & 22 days.
    Dave
  11. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Wow! To live that long, maybe he never put in the holster. I don't want to die with my boots on but in the saddle will be OK.
  12. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks geo26e for the appreciation.
    Dave
  13. pw-collector pw-collector, 1 year ago
    Thanks Kerry for the appreciation.
    Dave
  14. pw-collector pw-collector, 12 months ago
    Thanks egreeley 1976 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  15. pw-collector pw-collector, 12 months ago
    Thanks poop for the appreciation.
    Dave
  16. pw-collector pw-collector, 12 months ago
    Thanks petey for the appreciation.
    Dave
  17. pw-collector pw-collector, 11 months ago
    Thanks pickrknows for the appreciation.
    Dave
  18. pw-collector pw-collector, 11 months ago
    Thanks RonM for the appreciation.
    Dave
  19. pw-collector pw-collector, 8 months ago
    Thanks tom61375 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  20. pw-collector pw-collector, 8 months ago
    Thanks smaita for the appreciation.
    Dave
  21. pw-collector pw-collector, 8 months ago
    Thanks undreal & vanskyock24 for the appreciation.
    Dave
  22. pw-collector pw-collector, 8 months ago
    Thanks ttomtucker for the appreciation.
    Dave
  23. pw-collector pw-collector, 7 months ago
    Thanks tom61375 for the appreciation.
    Dave

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