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Royal Worcester Parian Figure, circa 1862

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China and Dinnerware1016 of 2532Fine Porcelain Strawberry Teapot19th Century English Butter Dome & Plate W. Adams Semi Porcelain
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Posted 1 year ago

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Nootch
(38 items)

Howdy: I share an exceptional Royal Worcester "Raphaelesque" parian figure (circle and crown mark), entitled "Goat". As documented in Henry Sandon's book entitled "Royal Worcester Porcelain from 1862 to the Present Day" (Plate #13) and his appendix of ornamental stock book #s, this is a Class 2 figure (model #16), based upon the theme of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. It depicts a semi-nude woman riding a horned goat and is highlighted in colors of pink, turquoise, gold, and burgundy. It measures 16" x 14" x 8". According to Hon. Wendy Cook, curator of the Museum of Worcester Porcelain (formerly the Dyson Perrins Museum), this is a very rare model today and very few were produced. I feel this example may, in fact, be unique today, as I know of no other in existence. Please let me know if you are aware of a similar example.

Comments

  1. maryh1956 maryh1956, 1 year ago
    Stunning! And to find it without any broken limbs is incredible!
  2. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    Major item of a great factory. Love parian ware and this is just wonderful!
  3. cverrastro cverrastro, 1 year ago
    I agree about the Shakespeare attribution, but "Riding the Goat" precedes Elizabethan times. There are illustrations and literary references wherein Witches and demons, and even a figure such as King Arther are pictured as riding goats, and it even features in a phony "ritual" of Masonry.

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