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Knut Bergqvist goblet vase- Lindefors 1930.

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lovely44 of 154Ingeborg Lundin's ÄPPLET, Orrefors, 1955A  BEAUTIFUL MIRROR
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Posted 1 year ago

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rebessin
(105 items)

Goblet vase with leg of six strings.
Height 220 mm.
Cup 110 mm wide on top.
Foot 95 mm wide.
Design: Knut Bergqvist for Lindefors glassworks 1930.

A drawing/sketch with this goblet vase and two other vases is preserved. It's signed: "KB 1930". The design with six glass strings (here in the leg) is typical for Knut Bergqvist in Lindefors 1928-31. Some legs on vases, lids on cups and stoppers for decanters, by Bergqvist, are provided with this string design. I don't think it's an easy work to bring the six strings as a leg on a glass. Machines can probably not make such glass either, so this is a fine example of the masterblowers pure skill I think.

History:
Lindefors glassworks was started in 1876. In a period they had the same owner as Bergdala. Under leadership of Alfred Sjö the two glassworks was one of the biggest producers of tableware and everyday glass in Sweden. The production layd down some years in the 1920s. The owner of Mjölby Kristallsliperi, Axel Träff, bought Lindefors in 1925 and in 1928 he started up the production again in collaboration with Knut and Eugen Bergqvist. They produced some glass for Mjölby. That company ordered uncutted raw glass from other makers and made traditional crystal models with cutted/grinded patterns and decorations on the glass, and saled it under the name Mjölby. But Lindefors produced also their own models and cutted/grinded glass in Lindefors, designed by Knut Bergqvist. This goblet vase is one of these creations by Bergqvist.

But the general economic crisis caused that many glassworks were closed down and production was dragged down sharply. For example fired Kosta at this time about 200 cutters/grinders. At Lindefors (1931) and Eda (1933) production was down completely. And from Eda came Edward Strömberg with his wife Gerda to Lindefors 1933. Gerda Strömberg was probably the first female glass designer in Sweden. She designed her first glass already at Orrefors glassworks, but at Eda 1927-33, she blossomed like a full-fledged competitor to her male colleagues in the industry. After Edward Stromberg leased Lindefors from 1933, she designed new glass models that have become classics. In the 1930s Lindefors changed name to Strömbergshyttan. Later, the Stromberg family also became the owner of the factory.

Comments

  1. vetraio50 vetraio50, 1 year ago
    Totally elegant!
  2. AmberRose AmberRose, 1 year ago
    So pretty. I wouldn't dare to use it. Especially after he second glass
  3. cobaltcobold cobaltcobold, 1 year ago
    A very filigrane work. You give me inspiration to expand my collection to earlier times. May I ask you as an expert whether you know this signature?

    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/92539-big-vase-of-unknown-designer?in=user

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