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1898-1900 Alfred Daguet / S. Bing Mixed Materials Letter Holder

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Posted 4 years ago

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cogito
(140 items)

Alfred Daguet had a wonderful talent for transforming four simple materials - copper, brass, wood and glass cabochons - into organic, flowing examples of the Art Nouveau aesthetic. This ornate double pocket letter holder is a prime early exemplar of Daguet's unique talent. Raised copper panels are mixed with cabochons of turquoise and pearly glass to pull together a peacock design theme popular at the beginning of the Art Nouveau design period. The top panel of the letter holder has two facing peacocks, while the cabochons are reserved for the "eyes" of their feathers. Peacock feather motif is featured on either side of the letter holder, while the front facing panel has a star, flower and wind blown grass design. Underneath the opulence resides a simple wooden letter holder, perfect and utilitarian in function. Daguet's work embodies early British Arts & Crafts singular artistic production, French Art Nouveau opulence, and the dreamy internal worlds of 19th century Symbolists.

Dimensions: 7.75" x 13" x 3.75"

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Alfred-Louis-Achille Daguet (Paris, 1875 - 1942). Daguet's early years are shrouded in mystery and little is known other than he was a pupil of Jean-Leon Gerome and Charles Clairin. In 1900, Daguet appeared quite suddenly on the Parisian art scene when his intricate metal works were exhibited by Siegfried Bing in his famed boutique L'Art Nouveau. A sizeable number of Daguet's works from this period are labeled, "Metaux S. Bing" or "Brass S. Bing," as if there were actually a special department for working metal or copper in Bing's gallery, but the real work was being conducted by Daguet himself in a studio directly above L'Art Nouveau. At the Paris Salon of 1903 and 1904, Alfred Daguet exhibited seven objects which were done in repousse' copper. For this exhibition Daguet gave his address as 22 Rue de Provence.

In 1905 Bing closed his gallery L'Art Nouveau, after which Daguet moved his metal studio to the Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques where his clients included Sarah Bernhardt and the Barrymores, Maurice and Lionel. In 1910, Dauget exhibited at the Salon of the Societe des Artistes Francais metalwork in "modern style" and ten more in a "different style." One of his last dated works prior to World War I is a mixed metal mirror frame from 1912, which was owned by Sarah Bernhardt.

During World War I Daguet was assigned as Sergeant Mechanic 2nd Aviation Group. During this time, he produced approximately 2000 sketches of various French and foreign early aircraft; designed numerous aviation manufacture advertisement posters; and was given the moniker of "true apostle of aerial art" based upon the scrupulous accuracy of the technical details and a keen sense of observation in his paintings and illustrations of the period. Attendees to an art exhibition that featured military aeronautics, held in 1919 in Paris, especially praised his watercolors of both French and foreign aircraft. An extensive collection of Daguet's aviation drawings and watercolors (~2000 drawings & 115 watercolors) is in the Musee de l'Air et de l'Espace at Le Bourget, near Paris.

After a 16 year eclipse during the War and successful aviation illustration stint, Daguet returned to decorative metalwork and exhibited largely religiously themed pieces in decorative hard steel and bronze in 1926 at the Musée Galliera.

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Salons:
Salon des Artistes français 1900, 1903, 1905, 1909, 1910
Societe nationale des beaux-arts 1901

Public Expositions:
Le Fer forge', le Cuivre et l'Etain - Musee Galliera, Paris (1905)
L'Art et le Mobilier religieux moderne - Musee Galliera, Paris (1926)

Comments

  1. cogito cogito, 4 years ago
    Thanks folks. If it hasn't been noticed, I have a bit of a Daguet obsession.
  2. SEAN68 SEAN68, 4 years ago
    stunning!!!!!
  3. SEAN68 SEAN68, 4 years ago
    where my slice of Daguet? LOL :)
  4. cogito cogito, 4 years ago
    LOL, Sean68. I'm afraid I'm a bit of hog.

    On a more serious note, I would warn folks about an increasing number of modern fakes or period type items being sold as Daguet. Unless you know what you are looking for, it is easy to get burned. If anyone finds something that is being sold as Daguet and is uncertain, feel free to shoot me an email. Hopefully I can help out.
  5. austrohungaro austrohungaro, 4 years ago
    This is such a lovely piece of art!!!!

    Don't worry, we all here have our small -as well as huge- obsessions . Just look at me and my Lütken obession :)
  6. jensen jensen, 4 years ago
    Oh, it's beautiful! Imagine living in a time/place where even a mundane letter holder looked like this!
  7. austrohungaro austrohungaro, 4 years ago
    I love your comment, jensen!!!
  8. SEAN68 SEAN68, 4 years ago
    LOL!!! cogito :)
  9. cogito cogito, 4 years ago
    Wholeheartedly agree, Jensen! My eye and curiosity are always drawn to objects with visual complexity and/or symbolic or narrative design elements.

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