Share your favorites on Show & Tell

Japanese woman statute made of wood

In Asian > Asian Statues > Show & Tell.
Midnight1208's loves188 of 1029Asian wooden Japanese Crane StatuteAlbert Scharning guilloche enamel and sterling brooch
3
Love it
0
Like it

LovelyPatLovelyPat loves this.
auraaura loves this.
Midnight1208Midnight1208 loves this.
Add to collection

    Please create an account, or Log in here

    If you don't have an account, create one here.


    Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate


    Posted 5 years ago

    lilminks2
    (3 items)

    I bought this from an old friend whose parents owned this piece. No idea the age or wood type. Pretty cool. She stands 18 inches tall. Hand carved. Looking for any identifying info.

    Unsolved Mystery

    Help us close this case. Add your knowledge below.

    logo
    Asian Statues
    See all
    Antique Chinese Famille Rose Figures Porcelain Jar With Lid Red Seal Mark
    Antique Chinese Famille Rose Figure...
    $208
    RARE Chinese Qing Dynasty CARVED HORN FIGURE
    RARE Chinese Qing Dynasty CARVED HO...
    $68
    A pair of figurines women statue with mark
    A pair of figurines women statue wi...
    $76
    Chinese 19thC Famille Rose Figural Teapot with 'Tong Zhi Nian Zhi' Mark
    Chinese 19thC Famille Rose Figural ...
    $31
    logo
    Antique Chinese Famille Rose Figures Porcelain Jar With Lid Red Seal Mark
    Antique Chinese Famille Rose Figure...
    $208
    See all

    Comments

    1. wexval, 5 years ago
      Your Japanese lady is Chinese and a model for lost wax molded figures.
    2. lilminks2, 5 years ago
      Thank you for your info. What are lost wax molded figures.?
    3. wexval, 5 years ago
      The process starts with a figure such as yours, but it can be anything, a marble, bronze, or ivory figure, vase, whatever. One or more molds are formed from the master which are then used to make wax figures, vases, etc.
      Imperfections in the wax form are then corrected by adding or removing wax and polishing. The wax shape is coated with plaster or investment, placed in an oven or kiln, and the wax is burned out (lost). The resulting mold is filled with resin or composition, white for ivory, green translucent resin to resemble jade, red to imitate cinnibar. Molten bronze, pewter, gold, and silver etc. can be used. The shape is broken out of the investment and you have a replica of the original. Much of the Asian art comes from Italy.
      Here are some examples from CW:
      http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/189529-cinnabar-vase?in=1018

      http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/186910-oriental-urn?in=1018

      http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/181908-unexpected-find?in=1018


    4. lilminks2, 5 years ago
      Wexval, thank you so much for all the info. I would never have guessed Italy as its origins. And thank you for explaining the lost wax process. I'm learning alot. Bless you.

    Want to post a comment?

    Create an account or login in order to post a comment.