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Pre-WWII U.S. 3rd Division Patches

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    Posted 5 years ago

    Chrisnp
    (310 items)

    The WWI 3rd Division was a “Regular Army” Division, made up of existing elements of the pre-war army. In July 1918 it was deployed along the Marne River, protecting against an advance on Paris when the Germans launched a major offensive. While adjacent units retreated, the 3rd Division held their ground, earning their nickname "Rock of the Marne". The color blue represents loyalty. The three stripes refer to the Division’s number and later, the three major WWI campaigns it participated in.

    The First patch is a “felt-on-felt” version that likely dates before WWII. This is the style of construction for US patches that began with the First World War, but then continued to be manufactured in the post war period. By WWII machine embroidered patches were rapidly replacing these, but I have seen WWII jackets with felt-on-felt patches. This one is two inches across. WWI versions of the 3rd Division patch tend to be a bit larger.

    The second patch is also a pre-WWII patch, or possibly an “in-country” manufactured patch purchased while stationed overseas. Instead of felt, the stripes are made of cotton ribbon. The edges have been folded over and crudely sewn in place. What makes me think it was not WWI manufacture is the white net-like backing you can see in the center of the back of the patch.

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    Comments

    1. racer4four racer4four, 5 years ago
      Interesting construction of the second one compared to the first Chris.
      The second one looks like something made by a sewer or tailor, judging by the use of the interfacing and the turned and basted edges. It's not very tidally done but there has been thought there. The interfacing being a woven one is good - non-woven interfacing was not much in use until the late 30s.
    2. Chrisnp Chrisnp, 5 years ago
      Thank you for all the right terms, racer4four. I'll be posting more patches and now I know what to call that white stuff! from what I have seen, this "interfacing" (I love it when I learn a new word!) does not seem to appear on WWI patches, but starts showing up on patches made between world wars.

      I assume it's meant to keep the thread from pulling through the felt?

      Chris
    3. racer4four racer4four, 5 years ago
      Depending where it is it would be called facing or interfacing. My use of terms for how it was done was a tad oceanic - I meant tidily!!
      Facing fabrics are generally used to give a piece body and stop distortion. Felt is particularly prone to it if it is a poor felt and I'm thinking the second patch is a much thinner felt which is why they faced it and turned the edges. Maybe if it was made on an overseas posting it was the only available weight in that colour. Facing does also help stop the bobbin thread from pulling through and gives the top thread a flatter look.

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