Share your favorites on Show & Tell

Victorian cased glass triple cornucopia vase

In Art Glass > British Art Glass > Show & Tell.
Belltown's loves57 of 1093Matisse copper enamel Pear Leaf earringsSquare calendar milk bottles..1948, 1949, 1966
14
Love it
0
Like it

beyemveybeyemvey loves this.
Michelleb007Michelleb007 loves this.
IvonneIvonne loves this.
racer4fourracer4four loves this.
bananapeelbananapeel loves this.
Rick55Rick55 loves this.
sklo42sklo42 loves this.
welzebubwelzebub loves this.
DeanoDeano loves this.
BelltownBelltown loves this.
martikamartika loves this.
auraaura loves this.
EfesgirlEfesgirl loves this.
vetraio50vetraio50 loves this.
See 12 more
Add to collection

    Please create an account, or Log in here

    If you don't have an account, create one here.


    Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate


    Posted 3 years ago

    IronLace
    (488 items)

    This is such an unusual vase, consisting of three horns that are fused together. Each horn has three layers of cased glass - a clear butterscotch over white with a pale pink interior. There is a small uranium content, I think in the white layer. It is from the Victorian era, I can see the link between this & other more rustic thorn or tube vases, & even epergnes. I think it might be English. But if anyone has any thoughts otherwise, I'm always happy to hear them!

    Comments

    1. Efesgirl Efesgirl, 3 years ago
      Victorians were all about lace, frills and general gaudiness. This looks much too new and much too clean in it's lines to be from the Victorian era. After a number of different searches on Google Images, I could not find anything resembling it.
    2. martika martika, 3 years ago
      Hello, I have got triple cornucopia vase, not glass, but pottery. It is from the late 19th century. I never saw anything similar to it until your post:
      http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/207678-crown-devon-vase-in-cornucopia-shape
    3. sklo42 sklo42, 3 years ago
      Have you considered that the outer casing of your vase may be amber glass? Amber casing can go unnoticed until you photograph the base at an angle. I think this is the case in image four.

      Knowing which victorian makers used amber as a casing colour may narrow the field a bit!
    4. IronLace IronLace, 3 years ago
      Hi Efesgirl, thanks for your thoughts. It is relatively simple in its form, but the level of workmanship in it is very like other more elaborate Victorian cased glass in my collection. There were, as martika suggests, some multiple cornucopia vases made in pottery at the same time. I also have some Victorian pottery vases that look like three bamboo sticks fused together.
      I did spot some multi tube vases in the reprinted Kralik catalogue I have, which show a similar design concept - they are not cased as far as I can tell from the small images, however. I suppose they were iridescent. But it does illustrate that vases made from multiple tubes, sticks, branches & corncopias had a vogue in the late 19th century.
      Hi sklo42, yes, this outer casing could be called a light amber, & it is somewhat more noticeable on the base of the feet. Along the main part of the cornucopias it has a pale butterscotch shade due to the white layer underneath.
      I have seen an image of some small cased glass vases with a pale yellow/butterscotch outer layer - in a book on vaseline glass (the uranium in mine seems to be in the white middle layer) They too had an inner of pale pink - but sadly no attribution other than most likely being English. They were not ribbed like this vase.
      A similar multi layered casing, also with uranium occurs in "Crushed Strawberry" glass by Walsh Walsh. In this, the pink is on the outside, with white & amber on the inside - a reversal of the casing on this piece.
      But this shape doesn't seem to match up with documented shapes made by Walsh Walsh.
      Interestingly enough, this is not the only example of this particular cased triple cornucopia that I've seen! Several years ago, I saw a similar, but taller version at a flea market. The pink inner layer was also a bit darker. Sadly I did not buy it as the price was too high for me that day, but I did take a photo to remember it by...& later I regretted not buying it. The one in my collection turned up on eBay last year, so I quickly bought it, feeling quite lucky to get a "second bite of the cherry", as I knew that there was something unusual about this vase.


    5. Michelleb007 Michelleb007, 3 years ago
      This is beautiful in its simplicity. I believe it is Victorian, and personally think it could be Bohemian due to the style and casing. I have seen a few similar pieces over the years. While a lot of Victorian era glass had the frills, some pieces did not. I just don't see a piece like this being made in more modern times.
    6. IronLace IronLace, 3 years ago
      Thanks Michelle...yes, & looking at the diagonally sliced tops on this piece makes me think of some Bohemian vases of the late 19th C which had the same design feature. That sliced top often turns up on jug shaped vases with applied flowers.

    Want to post a comment?

    Create an account or login in order to post a comment.