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Pond Bowl Vase

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    Posted 7 months ago

    HauteLookr…
    (39 items)

    Can someone please help me identify this pretty vase.
    Color blue with a dark bottom
    Meas: 10” diameter 6” tall
    I can’t determine what the signature is

    Thank you

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    Comments

    1. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 7 months ago
      I think it's Korean, but not sure. You can translate it if you have ab android smart phone, using an app and the camera on your phone. I tried with my computer, but the search wouldn't work! :^( Very beautiful vase though, I love the blended glaze, and free flow design! Thanks for showing, and good luck with your search! :^)
    2. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      billretirecoll, FWIW, I downloaded it to my so-called smart phone, and tried running it through Google Translate. Bupkes so far. I haven't found a writing system yet that 'likes' it. };-)

      I took a peek at a lot of writing systems online, including ancient Greek (not that I think this piece of pottery is ancient, but the artist might have devised a pottery mark using some ancient writing system).

      Here are the various Lexilogo keyboards if anybody wants to take a crack at it:

      https://www.lexilogos.com/keyboard/index.htm

      It is a beautiful piece of pottery, though. :-)
    3. HauteLookresale HauteLookresale, 7 months ago
      Thank you Keramikos and Billretirecoll
      I appreciate your comments
    4. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 7 months ago
      I asked my neighbor about the signature, and he said that it was old Chinese, but he couldn't read it. So not Korean but Chinese! :^)
    5. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 7 months ago
      Oh! He also said that it's upside down from the way that you have it! I hope this helps! :^)
    6. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      billretirecoll, Now we're cooking with gas. };-)

      *snip*

      The Large Seal and Small Seal scripts are still used to write names on personal name chops, and are also occasionally used to write company names on buildings, stationery, namecards, etc.

      The Draft or cursive script (??) is used mainly for Chinese calligraphy. This script can be written very quickly and uses a number of method to achieve this: omitting part of a character, merging strokes together, replacing portions with abbreviated forms (such as one stroke to replace four dots), or modifying stroke style.

      The Simplified script (a.k.a. Simplified Chinese), was officially adopted in the People's Republic of China in 1949 in an effort to eradicate illiteracy. It is also used in Singapore.

      *snip*

      https://www.omniglot.com/chinese/evolution.htm

      My money would be on Seal script, because of the personal name chop factor. Apparently Small Seal script is still so popular that it's being considering for inclusion in Unicode.

      Chinese characters for the words 'seal script' in regular script (left) and seal script (right):

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Seal_Eg.png

      Now to decipher the characters on the piece of pottery:

      *snip*

      Looking up seal characters is not as hopeless as other answers seem to indicate, even though it is considerably harder than looking up modern characters. In any case, the lookup needs to consist of identifying which component of the seal character is the radical and finding the character in the corresponding section. Identification of the radical needs to be done by trial and error, as there are no fixed rules that an be applied when you don't know the character in the first place.

      *snip*

      https://chinese.stackexchange.com/questions/22623/how-to-look-up-seal-script-characters

      And it goes on and on.

      It's too late in the day for a geezer like me, but anybody else who wants to take a crack at it, go for it. I might take another peek myself tomorrow afternoon.
    7. HauteLookresale HauteLookresale, 7 months ago
      Omg, thank you guys so much.
      I truly appreciate it
    8. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 7 months ago
      Thanks keramikos, good job! :^D You're very welcome HauteLookresale, now you can work at it, and be looking in the right direction! :^)
    9. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      I haven't made much progress in deciphering the pottery mark on this piece, and the short answer as to why: I'm old. };-)

      I was busy with other things yesterday, so about as far as I got was (re)establishing some basics, specifically the order in which to read far-east ideograms: top to bottom, right to left.

      Now to figure out which of some 3,300 seal script characters these might be. >8-0
    10. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      HauteLookresale, This is just a suggestion, but you might want to take another picture of that pottery mark, and reorient the rectangle to be parallel with the edges of your picture. It would be helpful in trying to use any software tools to read/translate the ideograms.

      Rotating a picture 90 or 180 degrees is a snap in something like Paint, but rotating it by any other degree typically requires another tool like Photoshop, which is great -- if you want to pay for it.
    11. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      Well, it's a bit frustrating, because I think I see some of the characters in that pottery mark in this list of 540 Shuowen Seal Radicals:

      http://guide.wenlininstitute.org/wenlin4.3/File:List_Seal_Radicals.jpg

      But I can't seem to get more information by clicking on the individual characters. More information that's intelligible to me, that is.

      FYI, a lot of these tools at least look better in Microsoft Edge than in Chrome or Firefox. The latter two browers just kind of vomit up some of the characters.

      That wenlininstitute dot org website has a wealth of information, but thus far, I haven't been able pound much of it into my brain.
    12. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      HauteLookresale, I hope you don't mind, but I took a copy of your picture of the pottery mark, edited it, and made a post. Please let me know if you want me to delete it:

      https://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/265699-cw-user-hautelookresales-pond-bowl-vase

      The reason I wanted a copy that was more or less oriented the 'right way' was to make it easier to decipher what appears to be a personal chop done in Seal Script.
    13. truthordare truthordare, 7 months ago
      This is very interesting and I think you are going in the right direction. I have a Chinese Antique collectors book, with page after page of marks, some with 2, 3, 4, 6 characters, and a translation, which is usually a poetic version that describes the pottery studio, here is a few example : "THE STUDIO OF THE OLD PINES, MADE ON THE BORDERS OF FUKIEN, MADE AT THE STUDIO OF GREAT ELEGANCE, THE EIGHT MONTH VILLAGE".

      All of these translations are for multi character symbols and seal script marks.
    14. Gillian, 7 months ago
      Hi Kera......
      I know what a chop means in many senses - but in what sense are u using it?
    15. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      truthordare, Thanks, that's fascinating.
    16. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      Gillian, I'm using it in this sense:

      *snip*

      The Large Seal and Small Seal scripts are still used to write names on personal name chops, and are also occasionally used to write company names...

      *snip*

      https://www.omniglot.com/chinese/evolution.htm

      As truthordare pointed out in her excerpt from a book on Chinese antiques, a chop could also identify a studio, and that could well be the case with this particular pottery mark.
    17. TheGallery TheGallery, 7 months ago
      This is a Chinese bowl.
      When I can find some time, I will look in my databases of Chinese mark.
      Most likely, this mark could result in a bowl scenario, means that the artist has a general view of his work, his name could also be part of this mark.
      Any other mark somewhere on the piece?
    18. keramikos keramikos, 7 months ago
      TheGallery,Thank you so much.

      So you think it's Chinese, as opposed to Japanese. I couldn't even decide on that, and it was one of only many obstacles for me. };-)

      I don't know if you read back through all of the comments, but I took a copy of the bowl's pottery mark, and made a post of it so that I could reorient the image, and hopefully make it a bit easier to interpret:

      https://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/265699-cw-user-hautelookresales-pond-bowl-vase

      I don't know if there are any other marks on the bowl. Hopefully, the owner will speak to that.

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