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Grand "Diamond Medallion" Pattern Glass- Cake Stand? and Footed Bowl

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    Posted 2 years ago

    LOUMANAL
    (422 items)

    Canadian Glass reference books list this Diamond Medallion pattern as having been made at the Diamond Glass Co. plant in Montreal, Quebec. American sources claim it was made by Bryce, Higbee & Co. in Pittsburgh, PA circa 1885. I am not debating the fact that it could have been made at these two places but what I would like to know is; what exactly was the small 7 3/4" by 3 3/4" footed platter used for? Much too small for a cake! Is it a rarely seen item? I also had a footed bowl in the same pattern that I included for comparison.

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    Comments

    1. TallCakes TallCakes, 2 years ago
      salvers (cake stands) were made in various sizes (as shown in catalogs) and presumed for stacking in service and/or storage. I have various sizes; the smallest is just over 5" and several patterns with 3-5 different sizes.

      On the pattern (FWIW) one reference does note that the OMN for the Bryce pattern was 'Grand' and originally included a scalloped fan edge; later versions called 'New Grand' had a plain edge as does yours...
    2. LOUMANAL LOUMANAL, 2 years ago
      Thanks Tallcakes! I had never seen a small one like this. Do you think that it was also made in Canada and is this size very common?
    3. TallCakes TallCakes, 2 years ago
      from my experience the smaller ones are indeed the hardest to find, and not many patterns included this small size. Not sure about the Canada connection as the references I've seen on this pattern make no mention of
      Canada...
    4. Newfld Newfld, 2 years ago
      Gorgeous diamond patterned glass


    5. LOUMANAL LOUMANAL, 2 years ago
      Thank you aura, truthordare, Broochman, AdeleC, hunterglee, fortapache, Newfld and vetraio50 for the loves. Bob
    6. Gillian, 2 years ago
      Someone is trying to find you:

      https://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/219926-what-is-it
    7. Gillian, 2 years ago
      Apologies for post #6 - but you have talked to this person before, but some time ago. He interrupted another post you had replied to try and get your attention.
    8. LOUMANAL LOUMANAL, 2 years ago
      Gillian....my email address is on my page. Click on Loumanal
    9. Paul71 Paul71, 2 years ago
      The pattern was not made in Canada. I mention how this confusion began in the first place in my book Homestead Glass Works: Bryce, Higbee & Company, 1879- 1907. I also discuss and document for the first time that Grand and New Grand were separate patterns. They were made by Bryce, Higbee & Company, not Bryce. Confusion abounds concerning the various factories and members of the Bryce family who were glass makers. Lumping all of them under the arbitrary "Bryce" category does nothing for accurately recording history, nor does it rightfully acknowledge the separate factories and people who labored over the glass we love and collect.

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