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A umbrella holder I just found

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Vintageadvantages76's items1 of 7Vintage jewellery is where it’s at!!One of my new vases
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    Posted 6 months ago

    Vintageadv…
    (7 items)

    Umbrella holder I found can anyone please help me with the reign mark I’m not sure but Qing ? I hope you can let me know

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    Comments

    1. Efesgirl Efesgirl, 6 months ago
      No idea, but it's fabulous!
    2. keramikos keramikos, 6 months ago
      Vintageadvantages76, Beautiful.

      Some assistance in reading the apparent seal chop (edited to remove actual Chinese characters, which CW S/W would render as question marks):

      *snip*

      Imperial reign marks are like all old Chinese texts read from top to bottom and from right to left. The first character is the top right character 1 that reads Da meaning "great". This is normally the first character in most Ming (1368-1644) or Qing dynasty (1644-1911) marks. This is very easy to memorize and then you will always know which way is "up". Character 2 tells us the dynasty as Ming or Qing. Earlier than that, porcelain did not have reign marks.

      Next two characters 3 - 4 are the emperors Nian Hao or reign title, name of the era, motto, or slogan. It is not the emperors name.

      The last column with the last two characters 5 - 6 merely say Nian Zhi usually translated as "Made".

      The marks are almost always written in two or three columns or very rarely - in a single horizontal row. Worth mentioning is that around 1950 the Chinese modernized their written language and started to write from left to right, as in the west. This practice also found its way to some of their porcelain marks from that time and onwards.

      *snip*

      https://gotheborg.com/marks/graphics/mark_demo.gif

      So if it were antique, the characters in the lower right-hand corner of the square would be the dynasty, and that doesn't appear to be Qing or Ming.

      It's still beautiful. :-)
    3. keramikos keramikos, 6 months ago
      More on seal marks:

      *snip*

      So these two red seal marks say the same thing apart from the one on the left has the additional 3rd column on the right saying "Great Qing" - which is a reference to the lengthy Qing Dynasty (1644 to 1912) within which the Emperor Qianlong reigned from 1736-1795.

      “Da Qing Qianlong Nian Zhi” translates as "Great Qing Qianlong Period Make". Many of these marks are on 20th century export replicas, and not the real thing.

      *snip*

      https://www.figurines-sculpture.com/pottery-identification-marks.html

      The characters in the middle column of the left-hand image in the picture below resembles the characters in the right-hand column of the seal chop on your piece (the chop on your piece appears to have only two columns):

      https://www.figurines-sculpture.com/images/red-seal-qianlong-qing-mark.jpg

      So perhaps it's meant to honor the reign of Emperor Qianlong, but it's probably not a genuine period piece.

      Again, still beautiful. :-)

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