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Tam O'Shanter Poem By Robert Burns Embossed Brass Scene Circa 1820

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vintagelamp's items18 of 776Boer War South Lancashire British Foreign Service Pith Helmet HatOrchestra Conductor's Baton Ivory Dog Head
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    Posted 1 month ago

    vintagelamp
    (776 items)

    Found this wonderful piece at an antique shop
    From the internet:
    "Tam o' Shanter" is a narrative poem written by the Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1790, while living in Dumfries. First published in 1791, it is one of Burns' longer poems, and employs a mixture of Scots and English.
    The poem describes the habits of Tam, a farmer who often gets drunk with his friends in a public house in the Scottish town of Ayr, and his thoughtless ways, specifically towards his wife, who is waiting at home for him, angry. At the conclusion of one such late-night revel after a market day, Tam rides home on his horse Meg while a storm is brewing. On the way he sees the local haunted church lit up, with witches and warlocks dancing and the Devil playing the bagpipes. He is still drunk, still upon his horse, just on the edge of the light, watching, amazed to see the place bedecked with many gruesome things such as gibbet irons and knives that had been used to commit murders and other macabre artifacts. The witches are dancing as the music intensifies and, upon seeing one particularly wanton witch in a short dress he loses his reason and shouts, 'Weel done, cutty-sark!' ("cutty-sark": short shirt). Immediately, the lights go out, the music and dancing stops and many of the creatures lunge after Tam, with the witches leading. Tam spurs Meg to turn and flee and drives the horse on towards the River Doon as the creatures dare not cross a running stream. The creatures give chase and the witches come so close to catching Tam and Meg that they pull Meg's tail off just as she reaches the Brig o' Doon.

    Comments

    1. jscott0363 jscott0363, 1 month ago
      Such an amazing piece. I love that scene and the story behind it. Wow, that's really quite a poem!!!
    2. vintagelamp vintagelamp, 1 month ago
      jscott,
      Thank you! I saw those nasty witches and had to have it!

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