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Baseball Team from Sharon Pa. 1920's

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Baseball Memorabilia45 of 729My Army sons' Dodger Jacket 1990Unknown Autographed Baseball?
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Posted 5 months ago

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Foundaroun…
(129 items)

Photo was bought online, Team is The Books Shoe Store. From the uniforms and people in the background it looks to be in taken in the 1920's. Here is an Obituary I found online.....
Frank J. ‘Ollie’ Oliver

Westinghouse retiree had entry in Ripley’s book

Frank J. “Ollie” Oliver of 1104 Hadley Drive, Sharon, passed away of natural causes at 2:50 p.m. Tuesday (1-29-08) in the hospital of Sharon Regional Health System with his family at his side. He was 97.

Mr. Oliver was born on Saturday, Sept. 10, 1910, in Steelton, Pa., the son of Onofrio and Agata Vicario Oliveri.

He worked in several capacities at the former Sharon Transformer Division of Westinghouse Electric Corp., retiring as a coilbuilder.

He was a member of Church of the Sacred Heart, Sharon.

Mr. Oliver was a member of North Sharon Volunteer Fire Department and Sons of Italy Shenango Valley Lodge, both Sharon.

He loved watching baseball games on television. In his early years, he played semi-professional baseball for several teams including Liberty Grille, Books Shoes, the Epps Army and Roberts Jewelry.

Mr. Oliver’s name was recorded in Ripley’s Believe It or Not for hitting the longest home run in history. During one of his baseball games, he hit a home run over the fence and the ball landed in a coal car that continued on to its destination.

In addition to sports, Mr. Oliver loved gardening. Ollie was noted for his hot peppers that he loved to share with family and friends.

During World War II, he worked for Erie Railroad as part of the war effort.

His wife, the former Kathryn Mary Mihalcin, whom he married Sept. 2, 1933, passed away April 1, 1994.

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