Collectorsweekly

When Whimsical Anti-Theft Tea Caddies Protected the World's Most Precious Leaf

On December 16, 1773, when Samuel Adams and his fellow Sons of Liberty boarded three British East India Company-flagged ships to hurl 340 chests of Camellia sinensis—worth almost $2-million today—into Boston Harbor, tea was already an expensive commodity worldwide. …

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