Collectorsweekly

Barbed Wire, From Cowboy Scourge to Prized Relic of the Old West

Why would anyone pay $500 for a rusty piece of barbed wire? Well, if the 18-inch long specimen, or cut, is the only known example of the Thomas J. Barnes patent of 1907 (shown above), some folks might pay even more than that. In fact, for collectors of barbed wire, …

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Berlin Iron, Silesian Mesh work jewelry