Collectorsweekly

To Hell With Helvetica: Is an 1874 Type Catalog the World's Most Beautiful Book?

William Hamilton Page was not the first American to earn a living cutting slabs of end-grain sugar maple into precisely ornate blocks of wood type, but he was definitely the first American to push this once-ubiquitous printing format into the realm of fine art. The …

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