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shaliberty's items2 of 11Beautiful Secretary cabinetHand made by an inmate in a prison
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    Posted 7 years ago

    shaliberty
    (11 items)

    We have no idea what this is. If anyone has any information, we would appreciate it. It seems to be a very unique item..

    Mystery Solved
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    Studio Art Pottery
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    Robin Welch Studio Pottery Vase Brutalist St Ives Leach Interest
    Robin Welch Studio Pottery Vase Bru...
    $117
    Stig Lindberg Style Horse Figurine Scandinavian Gustavsberg Art Studio Pottery
    Stig Lindberg Style Horse Figurine ...
    $82
    Studio Art Pottery Copper Glaze Raku Vase Louisiana Artist Signed Bruce Odell
    Studio Art Pottery Copper Glaze Rak...
    $52
    Signed Mid Century Modern Studio Pottery Weed Pot Vase Tiny
    Signed Mid Century Modern Studio Po...
    $40
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    Robin Welch Studio Pottery Vase Brutalist St Ives Leach Interest
    Robin Welch Studio Pottery Vase Bru...
    $117
    See all

    Comments

    1. CanyonRoad, 7 years ago
      This is contemporary raku studio pottery, more correctly called "American raku" or post-firing reduction. It's low-fired, and porous, so is for decorative use only.

      Here's a link to a page that explains more about the post-firing reduction process, and how it differs from traditional Japanese Raku: http://americanraku.com/raku.htm
    2. CanyonRoad, 7 years ago
      I probably should have mentioned that raku pottery like this isn't related in any way to anything Native American. It's a type of pottery which is generally credited to being started by American potter Paul Soldner in the 1960's, but which is now made by studio potters all over the world.

      The name "Raku" comes from a traditional Japanese pottery, but American raku isn't the same thing as Japanese Raku.
    3. shaliberty, 7 years ago
      Thank you for the reference to the Raku, wondering if we can figure out which artist may have made it, and it's age? Have added a couple more pictures. One of which appears to be the signature on the bottom, difficult to read, but may look familiar to someone.
    4. shaliberty, 7 years ago
      Appreciate CanyonRoad's response, I do love this site!

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