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  1. I would think Mexico, but can't positively confirm it.
  2. The most important key to identifying a Native American rug, which is often left out on web sites, and even in a lot of book references: they will never be woven with fringe on both ends. The N...
  3. "The shape looks like you could put it on the end of your double-barreled shotgun." Put it on and pull the trigger. It's been a rough day, month, year...
  4. It's a tropical wood, if that's any help. Pretty much rules out Eskimo!
  5. No, not Native American. It's contemporary stoneware, thrown on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln (none of which are techniques used by Native American potters.) It has the look of stu...
  6. All I can tell you is that they are not Native American pottery. The little black pot may be Mexican, from Oaxaca, or from farther south in Central America or even South America. The colors and li...
  7. It is not Hopi or Native American. It is contemporary Mexican pottery from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. The potters are Mexican, none claim any tribal affiliation, and the potte...
  8. Same initials, but seriously doubt it is by her. It looks nothing like the type of carving she did. You might contact the Western Woodcarvers Association (email is on their website) to see if anyo...
  9. Not necessarily. The neighboring towns of Tonala and Tlaquepaque make similar pottery, including burnished (brunido) ware in both. Tlaquepaque pottery is generally considered a little more "high end...
  10. It isn't Native American. It's Mexican, traditional burnished Tonala pottery, from the state of Jalisco. I'm not sure what the form is supposed to be. It starts out looking like a cantir (a tra...
  11. The tribal affiliation is Santa Clara Pueblo, but the date is incorrect. That particular shade of blue/gray clay slip wasn't discovered and used at Santa Clara until 1942, and has been used ever sinc...
  12. There's a lot of misinformation on the internet about Mata Ortiz pottery, so don't believe everything you read online. For one thing, this is not "Casas Grande" or "Casa Grande." Mata Ortiz is the ...
  13. All I can say is that it is a "fantasy piece," containing too many inaccuracies and mistakes to be considered as anything else.
  14. Where an item is purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. Shops in Arizona have long had trade contacts with the rest of the world. It's possible to buy items made in China, Afric...
  15. Diviners sashes were originally worn as a symbol of the owner's high spiritual position, and ability to foresee the future. Also called "king's sashes", since only kings and diviners could wear these...
  16. I've never seen anything like it. I'd say a studio potter, or an art student, got creative. The glaze looks like something used in the 1960s/70s. Size? Might help tell if it was intended to be...
  17. First of all, it's not Native American. Nor is it Chimayo (which also isn't Native American, but Hispanic, from New Mexico, named for the Hispanic village northeast of Santa Fe, where it's made.) ...
  18. The design pattern is in the style of a pre-Columbian pot, from Peru. The stylized bird head, seen in the second photo, and on the lower band of the first photo, is a distinguishing feature of Peruvi...
  19. Hopi, from northern Arizona, early 20th century.
  20. It's an "ancestral figure" from the Lower Sepik River region of Papua New Guinea, in the South Pacific. Possibly from Wangan Village. They represent anthropomorphic bird man ancestors, and are made...
  21. Round bottomed pots are thrown the same way flat bottom pots are, but the rounded bottom pot will be thrown with the inside of the bottom of the pot more rounded than flat. After they are cut of...
  22. Iron oxide and colored slip are two separate decorative techniques. Slip is made from a liquid clay, iron oxide can be either a natural or a manufactured pigment. Being unfired has nothing to do ...
  23. Interesting theory. But I doubt the pot is related to seed storage. First, seed jars are small. No one would think of storing seeds in a 24" x 18" jar. Plus seed jars, by definition, have small o...
  24. The bird depicted may be a puffin, or an auk, or any of the other close to 100 species of birds found on Baffin Island, but it's highly unlikely to be a penguin. Penguins are found in the Antarctic, ...
  25. All I can tell you for sure, is that it isn't from the Southwest United States, nor is it Native American. The rounded bottom, and the form itself, suggests Mexico. Some of the design patterns ...
  26. Unfortunately, these are not Native American Indian. They are traditional Mexican pottery water jars (botellon de barro), from Tonala, in the state of Jalisco. This particular type of potter...
  27. Your dolls are modern souvenirs, originally based on the authentic burial dolls, but there is a major way to tell the difference. The old ones had faces that were tapestry, woven into the fabric as ...
  28. Sorry, but it isn't antique, and not Native American. It's either studio pottery (most likely) or a souvenir import, since it isn't remotely similar to any Native American pottery. It is, howeve...
  29. Southwest, not Northwest. Typical Pima, from southern Arizona, based on the coiled willow foundation with devil's claw stitching, the black circle start in the bottom, the herringbone rim finish...
  30. I know this post dates back 8 years, but I have also been searching that long to find out who "R. Galvan" really is. I do know that "R. Galvan" is positively Mexican pottery. Many pieces can be ...
  31. If a point is "unfluted" it isn't a Clovis point. By definition, a Clovis point has "a base that is distinctly concave with a characteristic flute or channel." It's what identifies a Clovis point a...
  32. The style of decoration points to the mid-20th century, late 1940s-1950s, when these flower designs were popular on Acoma pots. The designs on Acoma pots changed over the years, and usually, along wi...
  33. This is not Native American or Indian pottery. It is Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. Pottery has been made in Mata Ortiz only since the late 1970s. It looks old, bec...
  34. It's traditional folk art pottery, from Chulucanas, Peru.
  35. It isn't Native American, it's African, a traditional style basket made by the Zulu, in South Africa. The "stacked" squares that make up the knob on the top, and the square plaited start on the botto...
  36. Despite the number of baskets you see on line, identified as "Navajo," the Navajo have never been known for their basket weaving. Cultural and religious restrictions on basket making in the 1800s an...
  37. It's similar to a folk art style slingshot handle. A number of West African tribes are known for their carved figures on slingshot handles. and they are also a popular souvenir item from Guatemala,...
  38. I'd call it a typical 1970s pottery class project. The stoneware clay and glaze, and especially the way it is trimmed and signed, point more in that direction than to studio pottery or art pottery. ...
  39. It definitely isn't a moose, since it has claws instead of hoofs! No idea where the pot is from, but the rounded bottom eliminates its being Native American, if that's any help.
  40. The basket is a twined cedar and beargrass basket, made by several tribes in the Pacific Northwest, in Washington state, and neighboring British Columbia. That would include the Nootka (now known as ...
  41. They are definitely not Native American, since no Native American tribe uses that particular combination of technique, colors, and materials. The wrapped stitch connecting the coils is commonly used ...
  42. It's an item made for sale in the village of Mata Ortiz, Mexico. Pottery was first made there in the late 1970s (so this cannot date to the 1950s). It looks older because the first pottery at Mata...
  43. Sorry, but this is not Native American. It is a "southwest style" copy, made for the souvenir market, and sold widely in shops, galleries, and trading posts in the Southwest. They are made in Pa...
  44. No, not an authentic pot made by Lucie Rie, IMHO. Form is wrong, signature is wrong, trimmed bottom is wrong, among other things. See the book "Lucie Rie" by Tony Birks, to confirm.
  45. Virtually all pueblo pottery made after the late 1800s was made for sale, to the tourists or collectors. The market kept the traditional crafts alive, and has provided a valuable source of income for...
  46. I really can't tell for sure, other than the "A Mar...."
  47. No, not Native American. It's in the style of Marajoara pottery, a traditional pottery from Brazil. Replicas are still being made today.
  48. There's a name for this: pareidolia. It's a normal human tendency, which some people (including myself) have, some more than others. It means one can see a pattern or image of something that does n...
  49. It is Santo Domingo (now called Kewa) pottery. Kewa Pueblo is an independent, sovereign Indian nation/tribe/pueblo located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was made for the souven...
  50. It is from Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. It is an independent, sovereign Indian nation/tribe/pueblo, located north of Santa Fe. The potter has followed a common way of signing at Jemez, by using on...
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

Hand Carved Wood Old Rabbit Rocker Toy SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.