CanyonRoad » collections

CanyonRoad

CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Comments

  1. No tribe, since it's not Native American. This is a typical Mexican souvenir basket, from the Toluca Valley region of central Mexico. The Burke Museum, administered by the University of Washingt...
  2. Thank you for posting this! I have an almost identical vase, same signature, that I've been wondering about for several years. I think I picked it up at the Palmer-Wirf Expo Antique Show in Portlan...
  3. This is a Yekuana basket, from the Amazon region of Venezuela. The distinctive flared shape identifies it as a "wiwa" or vase-shaped basket woven by the women of the tribe. Men weave a different style...
  4. It's African, a banana fiber basket from Uganda.
  5. It's not Native American, it's a typical Mexican basket from the Toluca Valley region of central Mexico. They usually feature images of horses or Native Americans because they were popular souvenir ...
  6. It's a Narino pottery design, from Colombia, South America. Probably not actually pre-Columbian pottery, but based on a Narino pattern. Age can't really be determined from a photo, in this case.
  7. Only one of the baskets is Native American, but it is not from the Northwest, and not related at all to the Coast Salish. The others are Chinese and African. The basket without the lid is Native...
  8. It's likely not going to be possible to figure out the artist. It is souvenir or gift ware, designed for the tourist market, with an "Indian" or "Southwest" style, and is not actually Native American...
  9. It is Hopi pottery, but I am not familiar with who signs with this hallmark. It is similar to Hattie Carl's, but her mark has a flower coming up out of the cloud. There is a Cloud clan at Hopi, ...
  10. As was pointed out already, when items are offered for sale, the legal definition of Native American, given in the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, is what is applied. A dictionary definition is perf...
  11. Definitely not Hopi. Hopi coiled baskets are made only on Second Mesa, and the basket makers are very conservative, never departing from traditional materials and patterns. The are always woven fro...
  12. Not Native American. It appears to be Chorotega pottery, from Costa Rica, based on the dark brown/almost black clay and incised white designs.
  13. I don't think there is any connection with King Kamehameha or with a knife. It appears to be the stopper from an Indonesian lime container.
  14. I agree that it looks like Nayarit pottery, from Mexico. Whether it is actual pre-Columbian, or a more modern pot, I can't say, however. I do wonder about what appears to be a feather inside?
  15. That is most likely going to be difficult, if not impossible, to determine without a signature or country of origin. It's assembled from beads and findings, which could have been made anywhere.
  16. Although it could probably be called "ethnic style," there is nothing at all to indicate that it is Native American, or even made in the United States.
  17. The pendant is may be vaguely Southwest or Native American style, but it is not Native American-made. It's a typical assembled piece, made up of purchased beads and charms, of the type made by co...
  18. I have no idea who made this either, but I do know, positively, that it is not Native American.
  19. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  20. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  21. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  22. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  23. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  24. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  25. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  26. These are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fanciful little figures, which usually c...
  27. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  28. True, it might be newer (but not older) than the early 1900s. The books, instructions, and materials are still available, so it could have been made any time since. The craftsmanship leaves a little...
  29. The combination of materials and weaving techniques are those used by any Native American basket makers. I would suspect it is what is generally called an Arts and Crafts Movement basket. These wer...
  30. This is a little tourist bowl, from Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico. It was decorated with poster-paint, and was a type of low-cost Southwest souvenir from the 1930s to around 1960. Only two pueblos,...
  31. It's Native American, but Isleta, not Zuni. This particular style of pottery was first made in the 1800s, when a small group of people moved from Laguna to Isleta. They brought their Laguna-style p...
  32. It doesn't look like her work, and isn't her signature, if that is any help. Both her cursive signature, and the stamp she used on her pottery, are illustrated on line, if you want to compare. ...
  33. It's factory-made souvenir pottery, produced by Cedar Mesa Pottery, in Blanding, Utah. The pots are greenware, made in a mold, and the designs are determined by the factory, which has over 60 pro...
  34. There are no puebloan Native American tribes in Otero County, they are located in northern New Mexico, and are believed to have moved there from even farther north, in the 1100/1200s. The only Nat...
  35. There are at least 8 or 9 Acoma potters with the last name Keene. Adrienne Keene is probably the best known, but she signs her whole name, and makes traditional, corregated, and miniature pieces prim...
  36. First, it's not Native American Indian, it's Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz. Pottery was first made in the village in the late 1970s, starting with Juan Quezada and his relatives. By the 19...
  37. Your basket is contemporary (last 25 years or less), African, made by the Hausa of Nigeria.
  38. It's not Navajo or Native American, if that's what you are asking. Would like to see some of the Navajo rugs, though.
  39. It was thrown on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln...so it's definitely not Native American pottery. The form and decoration aren't remotely like anything any Native American tribe produc...
  40. Looks like coiled palm fiber. No Native American tribal basket makers use this combination of technique and material. It could be Mexican, Chinese, or from some place in Africa. I haven't seen ...
  41. It appears to be contemporary Studio Pottery with a Native American design or theme, made for the decorator market, based on the way it is signed and decorated. It was fired in an outdoor fire, rat...
  42. It's called a "Buka" basket, and is from Papua New Guinea, north of Australia.
  43. They are both African, traditional designs from Botswana. The one on the left appears to be a variation of the pattern called "Forehead of the Zebra," and the other one "The Back of the Python." The...
  44. The basket is Chinese, of the type illustrated in Bryan Sentance's book "Art of the Basket, Traditional Basketry from Around the World," where it is correctly identified as a "Chinese twined rush bas...
  45. This pottery is African, a traditional style of pottery made by Berber women in Morocco. It's frequently mistaken for Indian pottery, since it is unglazed, fired with a pit-firing technique, and...
  46. It's traditional Hopi pottery, from Arizona. Like most Native American crafts available today, it was made for sale, for the tourist/collector market, which in the Southwest dates back to the late 18...
  47. No, not Zuni or Native American, based on the clay used (commercial stoneware, rather than local Zuni clay), the fact that it appears to have been glazed (the crackling effect near the neck), and the ...
  48. It's very problematic to attempt an identification, or date, (especially from a photo) of a shard once it's removed from its original site. It appears to be Ancient Puebloan (formerly called Anas...
  49. All I can tell you for sure, is that it isn't Native American, it was thrown on a potter's wheel, and is one of the specialized forms of pitchers usually associated with Eastern Europe or the Middle E...
  50. It's Peruvian, from Chulucanas, a famous pottery center in northwest Peru.
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

Hand Carved Wood Old Rabbit Rocker Toy SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.