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  1. None of the above. It's half of an Eskimo yo yo, in the shape of a moccasin/mukluk. If you're not familiar with an Eskimo yo yo, it's a popular souvenir item, made up of two identical stuffed fur ...
  2. The form, decoration, and patterns are typical of Berber pottery, from northern Africa, (primarily Morocco, but also Algeria, Tunisia. and neighboring countries)
  3. It's extremely unlikely that it's Navajo. Despite the popular misconception, Navajo women, until recently, made virtually no baskets, since there were so many taboos and cultural restrictions on the...
  4. That's "Botswana," not "Bostwana." Sorry for the typo.
  5. It's African, from Bostwana. A variation of the traditional Botswana "Forehead of the Zebra" pattern. The color changes taking place in the light cream area are an indication that it was probably m...
  6. Could be either, it has elements of work from both tribes. The form is more Santa Clara, the finishing (uneven polishing and streak marks) and design patterns (scalloped lower border and leaf shapes)...
  7. Depends on how heavy/thick the weaving is. If it's thick, it was probably intended as a rug. Otherwise it's just a textile that can be used for a number of purposes, such as a wall hanging, table cl...
  8. It's Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz, known world-wide today for its art pottery. Designs are often based on Indian pottery, although the potters are not. This particular bird design is bas...
  9. It's Mexican, not Native American Indian. Native Americans, for one thing, haven't woven blankets since the 1800s. Plus it is woven with fringe on the ends, another reason it cannot be Native Americ...
  10. It's made with split bamboo, definitely Asian, most likely Chinese...but similar baskets were made in the Philippines. The "swastika" symbol on the lid is found in cultures all over the world, us...
  11. No, it's not Navajo, and the Apache tribes do not weave rugs. The Navajo are the only U.S. Native American tribe that weaves rugs. It's from somewhere else, but that's about all I can tell you.
  12. Zapotec rugs have fringes, but so does every other hand woven rug in the world...except for Navajo rugs. The only thing woven fringe on both ends proves is that it eliminates the possibility of it be...
  13. Chimayo rugs are not Mexican. They are part of the Colonial Art heritage of northern New Mexico. The weavers are descendants of the Spanish settlers who came from Spain in the 1600s. Not Native Ame...
  14. It's a kilim, from the Middle East, Turkey, or Central Asia. Navajo rugs are identified not by their design, but by the way they are woven. Because the Navajo use a unique type of loom and weaving ...
  15. Twin Wells Indian School is located in Holbrook, Arizona. No Oregon connection. That last word is probably "Arizona." There is a Joseph City in Navajo County, Arizona, which just happens to be...
  16. No, not Native American. This is a traditional burden basket, made by the women of the indigenous Yanomami (various spellings) people of the Amazon rain forest of Brazil and Venezuela. It's contem...
  17. Unless you know who wove the rug, there is really no way of knowing which part of the Navajo Reservation this is from. It's a common misconception that Navajo rugs fall into a certain regional st...
  18. Based on the materials used, the form, the weaving technique, and the particular design used on the woven top band, this appears to be Asian, most likely from the Philippines. The only thing I c...
  19. It's studio raku pottery, by Ben Diller, who owns Maui Clay, in Maui. He is not Native American, but sells Native American "inspired" pottery all over the country. He is best known for his raku, and...
  20. It's Hopi, from Arizona. Mid-20th century.
  21. Yes, copies of Tularosa designs are fairly common on Acoma pottery, both with and without fine line patterns.
  22. The fact that it is unsigned, plus the little "pop-outs" (spalling), date this to the 1960s. This was a period when Acoma's clay source developed some impurities that resulted in the tiny white def...
  23. No, not from any of the 21 independent southwest puebloan tribes (there is no "Pueblo" tribe, the term came from the early Spanish, who called any tribe they encountered that lived in apartment-like h...
  24. The dates could be right, and it could have been purchased anywhere, but it was made in southern Arizona. This is a Papago (now called Tohono O'odham) basket, made from yucca and devil's claw.
  25. Sorry I didn't ever return to this post, and therefore didn't notice that there were additional questions/comments until just now. So here's my update: No, this is not Ken Edwards pottery. Ken wa...
  26. This isn't a Pendleton blanket. Pendleton always had a blue and gold, rectangular label. (Nor is it a blanket, the fringed textiles are technically classified as shawls.) The remnants of the labe...
  27. I wouldn't call it an effigy of any sort, just an odd-shaped spout. Looks like mid-20th century Cochiti, based on the bold and graphic leaf and flower design.
  28. It lacks the black or indigo stripe found on authentic Hudson Bay blankets, and the black points. Plus Hudson Bay blankets didn't come with a satin binding like this. So I'd say no, just a well-made...
  29. Isleta Pueblo, 1900-1920.
  30. No, not Inuit, although I can see why that might be thought, based on the. photo. To someone who has seen hundreds of similar bird dishes, however, it's instantly identified as traditional black pott...
  31. It's a contemporary pot, made in Mexico, by the Tarahumara of the Copper Canyon region. They are popular souvenir and/or decorator items. The old Jackalope store in Santa Fe used to carry them...
  32. It looks like a Mohave pot, from what I can see. (The Osage were semi-Nomadic Plains Indians, and did not make pottery.)
  33. Sorry, but this isn't Native American. It was made in Pakistan, from date palm fiber. The designs are often copied from Native American Indian baskets, but the colors used, and the material itse...
  34. It's a Herter's wood duck, with a rather odd paint job. (generally wood ducks have gold/tan coloring where the gray is, and white on the cheeks/head.) Should be stamped on the bottom, "Herters Inc. ...
  35. Vitrification is not connected with a particular type of kiln, but with the particular type of clay. Every clay has a different vitrification temperature, the temperature at which the chemical reacti...
  36. It's a class project, probably someone from 4th Period Pottery, based on the way it is signed, and the craftsmanship. Could have been made anywhere, nothing really shows any indication of it being fr...
  37. First one is Hopi, made on the Second Mesa. It's a bundle-coiled basket with non-interlocking stitches, made from yucca. It most likely dates to the first quarter of the 20th century. The more rece...
  38. Since all Navajo rugs are made for sale, to tourists and/or collectors, the market generally drives the styles, colors, and designs that are popular and therefore most likely to sell. So when the ru...
  39. All I can tell you for sure, is that it isn't Native American. It might be Mexican, might be a factory-made "southwest style" piece made for the tourist trade.
  40. It does appear to be a Navajo rug. It would help if you had a clear closeup photo of a corner and the edge of the rug, but from what I can see, it looks authentic. There is no name for the pattern...
  41. You have a mix of Mexican, southwest US Native American pieces, and one factory-made Sioux Pottery item from South Dakota. The carved wood piece in upper right is a chocolate stirrer, called a mol...
  42. There is a company in South Dakota that makes this type of pottery. It is often signed with a name, followed by "S.P.R.C. S.D." which stands for Sioux Pottery, Rapid City, South Dakota. There may b...
  43. It's not traditional Native American pottery. It appears to be a commercial greenware piece (made from a mold), and glazed on the inside, unlike authentic Native American pottery. The white cla...
  44. I just can't tell for sure from the photos. Possibly early 20th century Hopi, but possibly not Native American. The reddish color showing through the buff slip (?) doesn't look quite right for Hopi.
  45. Sorry, but this is not Native American, although it was probably designed to give that impression. It is contemporary pottery from Lombok, Indonesia. They have been combining this particular type o...
  46. I'd say late 1890s/early 20th century, as far as dating goes. Cochiti is a possibility, but so is Tesuque Polychrome. Check out some of the design patterns shown in Harlow's "Matte-Paint Pottery," ...
  47. Experts on Santo Domingo pottery, from Harlow to Allan Hayes, have discussed the difficulty in precisely dating a lot of Santo Domingo pots. I'm assuming there are no marks on the bottoms, which c...
  48. Harlow himself has admitted the difficulty in distinguishing between some early Cochiti and Santo Domingo pots. That led to his defining the term "Kiua Polychrome" in the 1960s, as the prevailing s...
  49. According to "The Myth and Magic of Nemadji 'Indian' Pottery" by Michelle D. Lee (the definitive reference on the topic), this "Indian head" stamp was actually the last stamp used by the factory, fro...
  50. Sorry, I'm too sick with the flu right now to help much. I'll get back to you when things improve.
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

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SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.