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  1. They are African, early to mid-20th century, from Nigeria. Probably Hausa tribe.
  2. Not sure what you are saying/asking. Pendleton is a woolen mill and textile manufacturer headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and Beaver State is one of their brands, reserved for textiles they produce...
  3. It's a good example of two of the main rules of antique collecting: museum replicas of items in their collections have been produced probably as long as museums have existed. And items have been foun...
  4. I'm afraid that there is no such thing as a "Native American wooden marble." Just from the photo shown, it appears you have a glazed clay marble, identified by the tiny colored "bullseye" that oc...
  5. It's a well-made basket, but not Hupa (they only make twined baskets, and this is coiled), or Native American. Unfortunately, no Native American tribe that makes baskets uses this particular combinat...
  6. It isn't Native American, it's constructed basically like a quiver for blow dart arrows, most likely from one of the tribes in Borneo (Iban, or any of the other 300 or so ethnic groups.) That's a...
  7. It's a decorative wall hanging from Guatemala, identified by the distinctive painted black "eye lash" markings, found on many of their masks and carved figures.
  8. These appear to be examples of pareidolia and motivated perception.
  9. It appears to be a contemporary souvenir from the Williamsburg Pottery Factory in Virginia. The company has been a major tourist attraction for years, expanded to include factory outlet stores and a ...
  10. It isn't Native American, since it was woven on a standard horizontal floor loom. The Navajo are the only U.S. tribe that weaves rugs (they haven't woven blankets since the 1800s), and they use a u...
  11. It looks like the writing on the bottom includes the last part of the name "Gachupin," a surname associated primarily with potters from Jemez, but also found at Zia. This certainly looks like tr...
  12. It isn't Native American, since the Navajo are the only U.S. tribe that weaves rugs on looms, and they use a unique type of loom (upright, with a continuous loop), which makes it physically impossibl...
  13. It's a "Botellon De Barro," a traditional Mexican pottery water jar, from Tonala, in the state of Jalisco. This particular type of pottery is called canelo (cinnamon) brunido. Canelo for the co...
  14. No one who knows anything about southwest Native American pottery would ever mistake Kewa (Santo Domingo) pottery for Navajo pottery. It's pretty obvious this "appraiser" isn't a specialist when it c...
  15. No, not the 1940s. This stamp was used on Nemadji pottery from 1973 to 1980. The form itself first appeared in the Nemadji catalog 1969-1972, was still in the 1973 catalog. The definitive referen...
  16. No, it's not Navajo. It's a Santo Domingo (now called Kewa) tourist piece, ca.1930s. Kewa is located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, New Mexico, and is totally unrelated to the Navajo.
  17. No, it's not raku. American raku, or post-firing reduction, is a firing technique that turns the clay body black, as a result of a chemical reaction from oxygen being blocked from reaching the potter...
  18. I'd agree with the "not old" part, but think it's more likely a contemporary "tourist" mask from Guatemala. Those distinctive lower eyelashes are found on lots of Guatemalan masks, and the countr...
  19. It appears to be a contemporary woven piece from Central or South America, known for that "hairy" yarn made from llama or alpaca wool, not Alaskan.
  20. "The shape looks like you could put it on the end of your double-barreled shotgun." Put it on and pull the trigger. It's been a rough day, month, year...
  21. It's a tropical wood, if that's any help. Pretty much rules out Eskimo!
  22. No, not Native American. It's contemporary stoneware, thrown on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln (none of which are techniques used by Native American potters.) It has the look of stu...
  23. All I can tell you is that they are not Native American pottery. The little black pot may be Mexican, from Oaxaca, or from farther south in Central America or even South America. The colors and li...
  24. It is not Hopi or Native American. It is contemporary Mexican pottery from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. The potters are Mexican, none claim any tribal affiliation, and the potte...
  25. The tribal affiliation is Santa Clara Pueblo, but the date is incorrect. That particular shade of blue/gray clay slip wasn't discovered and used at Santa Clara until 1942, and has been used ever sinc...
  26. There's a lot of misinformation on the internet about Mata Ortiz pottery, so don't believe everything you read online. For one thing, this is not "Casas Grande" or "Casa Grande." Mata Ortiz is the ...
  27. All I can say is that it is a "fantasy piece," containing too many inaccuracies and mistakes to be considered as anything else.
  28. Where an item is purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. Shops in Arizona have long had trade contacts with the rest of the world. It's possible to buy items made in China, Afric...
  29. Diviners sashes were originally worn as a symbol of the owner's high spiritual position, and ability to foresee the future. Also called "king's sashes", since only kings and diviners could wear these...
  30. I've never seen anything like it. I'd say a studio potter, or an art student, got creative. The glaze looks like something used in the 1960s/70s. Size? Might help tell if it was intended to be...
  31. First of all, it's not Native American. Nor is it Chimayo (which also isn't Native American, but Hispanic, from New Mexico, named for the Hispanic village northeast of Santa Fe, where it's made.) ...
  32. The design pattern is in the style of a pre-Columbian pot, from Peru. The stylized bird head, seen in the second photo, and on the lower band of the first photo, is a distinguishing feature of Peruvi...
  33. Hopi, from northern Arizona, early 20th century.
  34. It's an "ancestral figure" from the Lower Sepik River region of Papua New Guinea, in the South Pacific. Possibly from Wangan Village. They represent anthropomorphic bird man ancestors, and are made...
  35. Round bottomed pots are thrown the same way flat bottom pots are, but the rounded bottom pot will be thrown with the inside of the bottom of the pot more rounded than flat. After they are cut of...
  36. Iron oxide and colored slip are two separate decorative techniques. Slip is made from a liquid clay, iron oxide can be either a natural or a manufactured pigment. Being unfired has nothing to do ...
  37. Interesting theory. But I doubt the pot is related to seed storage. First, seed jars are small. No one would think of storing seeds in a 24" x 18" jar. Plus seed jars, by definition, have small o...
  38. The bird depicted may be a puffin, or an auk, or any of the other close to 100 species of birds found on Baffin Island, but it's highly unlikely to be a penguin. Penguins are found in the Antarctic, ...
  39. All I can tell you for sure, is that it isn't from the Southwest United States, nor is it Native American. The rounded bottom, and the form itself, suggests Mexico. Some of the design patterns ...
  40. Unfortunately, these are not Native American Indian. They are traditional Mexican pottery water jars (botellon de barro), from Tonala, in the state of Jalisco. This particular type of potter...
  41. Your dolls are modern souvenirs, originally based on the authentic burial dolls, but there is a major way to tell the difference. The old ones had faces that were tapestry, woven into the fabric as ...
  42. Sorry, but it isn't antique, and not Native American. It's either studio pottery (most likely) or a souvenir import, since it isn't remotely similar to any Native American pottery. It is, howeve...
  43. Southwest, not Northwest. Typical Pima, from southern Arizona, based on the coiled willow foundation with devil's claw stitching, the black circle start in the bottom, the herringbone rim finish...
  44. I know this post dates back 8 years, but I have also been searching that long to find out who "R. Galvan" really is. I do know that "R. Galvan" is positively Mexican pottery. Many pieces can be ...
  45. If a point is "unfluted" it isn't a Clovis point. By definition, a Clovis point has "a base that is distinctly concave with a characteristic flute or channel." It's what identifies a Clovis point a...
  46. The style of decoration points to the mid-20th century, late 1940s-1950s, when these flower designs were popular on Acoma pots. The designs on Acoma pots changed over the years, and usually, along wi...
  47. This is not Native American or Indian pottery. It is Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. Pottery has been made in Mata Ortiz only since the late 1970s. It looks old, bec...
  48. It's traditional folk art pottery, from Chulucanas, Peru.
  49. It isn't Native American, it's African, a traditional style basket made by the Zulu, in South Africa. The "stacked" squares that make up the knob on the top, and the square plaited start on the botto...
  50. Despite the number of baskets you see on line, identified as "Navajo," the Navajo have never been known for their basket weaving. Cultural and religious restrictions on basket making in the 1800s an...
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

Hand Carved Wood Old Rabbit Rocker Toy SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.