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  1. Sorry, but this is not Native American, although it was probably designed to give that impression. It is contemporary pottery from Lombok, Indonesia. They have been combining this particular type o...
  2. I'd say late 1890s/early 20th century, as far as dating goes. Cochiti is a possibility, but so is Tesuque Polychrome. Check out some of the design patterns shown in Harlow's "Matte-Paint Pottery," ...
  3. Experts on Santo Domingo pottery, from Harlow to Allan Hayes, have discussed the difficulty in precisely dating a lot of Santo Domingo pots. I'm assuming there are no marks on the bottoms, which c...
  4. Harlow himself has admitted the difficulty in distinguishing between some early Cochiti and Santo Domingo pots. That led to his defining the term "Kiua Polychrome" in the 1960s, as the prevailing s...
  5. According to "The Myth and Magic of Nemadji 'Indian' Pottery" by Michelle D. Lee (the definitive reference on the topic), this "Indian head" stamp was actually the last stamp used by the factory, fro...
  6. Sorry, I'm too sick with the flu right now to help much. I'll get back to you when things improve.
  7. Not Native American. It's a manufactured trade blanket, made by one of several factories, the most famous probably being Pendleton, but also including Capps, Racine, Buell, and Shuler & Benninghofen....
  8. Good information on northern California basketry materials and techniques. Keep in mind, however, that the basket in question is not from California. The blog confirms many of the reasons why. For ...
  9. It's contemporary African, a coiled palm fiber basket made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  10. It's from southern Arizona, a traditional coiled yucca and devil's claw basket made by the Papago (now called Tohono O'odham.)
  11. It's African, a coiled palm fiber basket from Namibia.
  12. I'd say the candle holder is more likely Isleta, circa 1920, rather than Laguna. When you see the orange scalloped pattern on the bottom of a small bowl, it's Isleta. While this is on the inside...
  13. Not Native American Indian, but possibly the beads are from India. Appears to be a recently-made crafter's project, put together with turquoise-colored glass seed beads and inexpensive wooden heish...
  14. I'd agree, Santana Tenorio, ca. 1950 bowl. Allen Hayes and John Blom can be trusted to accurately identify what they show in their books. "Southwestern Pottery" is one the best references on the sub...
  15. I'd say it has a 1980s shape, and definite Santo Domingo (now called Kewa) Pueblo design patterns. I don't see any resemblance to Old Laguna pottery. The stylized leaf shapes, the banding lines b...
  16. Both the Zulu and the Ndebele from southern Africa make traditional beaded dolls. The colors and the size of the beads used generally is different, and they also incorporate wrapped wire in some of ...
  17. I'd say it's "Native American themed design" but not Native American made, and therefore can't be sold as such. It looks more like a studio pottery piece, made for the decorator market, which is wha...
  18. They are African, made in the Binga region of Zimbabwe by basket weavers of the Tonga tribe. Usually found on the web under a search for Tonga/Binga baskets. (Not to be confused with Tongan baskets...
  19. No, not rat or mouse bones. These are a Zuni folk art, made for the souvenir trade, beaded over a rabbit's foot. They were still being made like this in the 1990s, but most now are beaded over rolle...
  20. No, not Native American. It's a traditional type of African canteen, made by many tribes in Ethiopia, Sudan, Kenya, etc. Maybe someone can narrow it down more, but it's definitely African.
  21. The only thing I can tell you, is that it definitely isn't Native American, based on the fringe, thick cord along the edge, and the weaving technique itself...none of which is characteristic of Native...
  22. It's African, from Sudan. Here's another one, from Ancient Artifax Galleries: http://ancientartifax.com/gallery.htm
  23. Scarysherrie, both your pot, and this one posted 9 months ago by dealqueen, are African, specifically from Sudan. They look old, but are contemporary. The main identifying features are the thick rol...
  24. Pottery with decoration wasn't made by the Shipibo until after World War II. Before that they only made undecorated pottery for their own use. After the war, missionaries suggested that they decora...
  25. It's Mexican, not Native American. A traditional Huastecan water jug, from San Luis Potosi, illustrated in "Ceramica, Mexican Pottery of the 20th Century" by Amanda Thompson, if you'd like a refe...
  26. African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  27. It's always a good idea to verify information given when purchasing something, especially in the area of Native American art. So you did the right thing by posting here to do so!
  28. It's always a good idea to verify information given when purchasing something, especially in the area of Native American art. So you did the right thing by posting here to do so!
  29. It's always a good idea to verify information given when purchasing something, especially in the area of Native American art. So you did the right thing by posting here to do so!
  30. It's always a good idea to verify information given when purchasing something, especially in the area of Native American art. So you did the right thing by posting here to do so!
  31. Where something was purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. Santa Fe is a world center of crafts, and its International Folk Art Museum has the largest collection of international fol...
  32. Where something was purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. Santa Fe is a world center of crafts, and its International Folk Art Museum has the largest collection of international fol...
  33. Where something was purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. Santa Fe is a world center of crafts, and its International Folk Art Museum has the largest collection of international fol...
  34. Where something was purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. Santa Fe is a world center of crafts, and its International Folk Art Museum has the largest collection of international fo...
  35. Yes, it's Native American, an early 20th century Hopi redware pot, made for the tourist or collector market. The space in the black framing line is known by several terms (spirit line, spirit br...
  36. No, this is not related in any way to Maria Martinez, or to traditional black on black pottery. Maria, from San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico, made traditional pottery, meaning the clay was dug locall...
  37. Also a mistake in your identification. This is not an Indian basket. It is African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria. (Also one of the most-commonly misidentified as Native American Indian, if it is ...
  38. Yes, it's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  39. It's a style of blackware done by several potters at San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico, but unusual in that it doesn't have a signature. Is it possible that it could be the lid to a bowl, and the sign...
  40. The design is usually referred to as a deer or antelope. What looks like ears sticking straight up is actually supposed to be the horns. The ears are depicted sticking out to the back, below the hor...
  41. It is from Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico. It was traditionally-made, from local clay, and paints made from local materials. The orangish spots on the white clay are fire clouds, an indication that it was...
  42. It's a contemporary African basket, from the Harar region of eastern Ethiopia.
  43. It's none of those. It's African, a palm fiber basket from Botswana.
  44. Sorry, but they are not Native American. The lidded one with the red and green paint is Chinese. The other lidded one is African, from Ethiopia, and the large oval basket is Mexican, from the Toluca...
  45. That's correct, it is African. It's a Masai beaded neckpiece, from Kenya. Probably made for sale, but certainly in keeping with traditional Masai work. The little discs attached by chains to the be...
  46. It's Yanomami, from the Amazon Basin of Brazil and Venezuela.
  47. It's actually African, a traditional Zulu palm fiber herb basket, from South Africa.
  48. I've seen this work before, but am unfamiliar with exactly who "Jae" is. It appears, however, that this "Jae" signature may refer to Jarvis Antonio. Pottery signed Jarvis Antonio is very similar, ...
  49. The orange V-shaped beak, style of eyes, and wing pattern is typical of the owls made by several Acoma potters, not just Eva Histia. More important, I feel, is that every owl of hers that I've se...
  50. I think you were right on both counts...early 1900s, and Zuni. More complete answer at: http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/231510-can-you-assist-with-identification-pueb?in=1039#comment-1095303
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED. Possibly a Native American Woven Basket