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  1. It's called a "Buka" basket, and is from Papua New Guinea, north of Australia.
  2. They are both African, traditional designs from Botswana. The one on the left appears to be a variation of the pattern called "Forehead of the Zebra," and the other one "The Back of the Python." The...
  3. The basket is Chinese, of the type illustrated in Bryan Sentance's book "Art of the Basket, Traditional Basketry from Around the World," where it is correctly identified as a "Chinese twined rush bas...
  4. This pottery is African, a traditional style of pottery made by Berber women in Morocco. It's frequently mistaken for Indian pottery, since it is unglazed, fired with a pit-firing technique, and...
  5. It's traditional Hopi pottery, from Arizona. Like most Native American crafts available today, it was made for sale, for the tourist/collector market, which in the Southwest dates back to the late 18...
  6. No, not Zuni or Native American, based on the clay used (commercial stoneware, rather than local Zuni clay), the fact that it appears to have been glazed (the crackling effect near the neck), and the ...
  7. It's very problematic to attempt an identification, or date, (especially from a photo) of a shard once it's removed from its original site. It appears to be Ancient Puebloan (formerly called Anas...
  8. All I can tell you for sure, is that it isn't Native American, it was thrown on a potter's wheel, and is one of the specialized forms of pitchers usually associated with Eastern Europe or the Middle E...
  9. It's Peruvian, from Chulucanas, a famous pottery center in northwest Peru.
  10. Glad I could be of help. I agree, CW is a good place to find answers. (And thank you for marking this Mystery Solved!)
  11. It's Mexican, not Native American. It's Mata Ortiz pottery, named for the village in northern Chihuahua, Mexico, where it is made. It's a relatively new type of pottery tradition. Pottery making i...
  12. According to the book "The Myth and Magic of Nemadji 'Indian' Pottery" by Michelle D. Lee, the stamp on the bottom was actually one of the last stamps used by the company, from 1980-2001. Production ...
  13. Forgot to add that yes, it is missing a lid.
  14. This is a traditional style Japanese kyushu (teapot) used for green tea. The distinctive side handle can be found in other Asian countries, as well as in the U.S., but is said to have originated for ...
  15. This is an imported basket, not Native American, identified by the construction technique (the wrapped stitches joining the coils) which is not found on any Native American baskets. It also appears t...
  16. It may have been purchased in Arizona, but wasn't made there. This isn't Native American. The construction technique, where the coils are joined by a wrapped stitch that leaves a space between the ...
  17. It's Nootka/Makah, from northwestern Washington state (Makah) or neighboring Vancouver Island, British Columbia (Nootka, now known as Nuu-chah-nulth.) Made for the tourist trade, from cedar and bear ...
  18. Fraser River area of British Columbia, Canada. It's a partially imbricated (the design patterns) cedar basket.
  19. No, it isn't "crazy old." It could have been made last week, or last year, though, since "old" is relative. It was made by pressing lumps of firm clay into a mold (or several molds, depending on ...
  20. It's a nice basket, but it isn't Native American. It's Chinese, usually referred to as a "Chinese sewing basket," made of split bamboo, primarily for export. Older ones came with silk tassels, Chine...
  21. Well, I learned that some people don't realize that "maked" isn't a word!
  22. Not sure what you mean. I've never heard the term "maked on the spot" used in any field, art or otherwise.
  23. This is traditional Navajo pottery, from the Cow Springs area of the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. It is hand-coiled from local clay, dried, and fired in a wood bonfire. While it is still hot afte...
  24. It is contemporary (1980s to the present) pottery from the village of Mata Ortiz in northern Chihuahua, like two of the other pots you posted about. This one shows the influence of design pattern...
  25. Not early 1900s, but it is Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz. Same as the other pot you posted about: https://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/264294-love-this-piece--anybody-know-its-origi?in...
  26. It's Mata Ortiz pottery, named for the village of Mata Ortiz in northern Chihuahua, where it is made. It's considered Contemporary Art Pottery by the Mexican government. The potter, David Ortiz, i...
  27. Just in the interest of accuracy, to potters (especially in Japan) there is a distinction between "nerikomi' and "neriage," although the two are often confused. "Neri" is the Japanese root word ...
  28. Possibly Indian, as in India, but there is definitely not any connection with Native American Indian, or war paint. Clear, non-fuzzy, photos would help identify where exactly it came from, but Na...
  29. It probably came from Mexico. It's not Native American, since the Navajo are the only U.S. tribe that weaves rugs, and they use a unique type of loom and weaving technique that identifies their w...
  30. Is it actually glass? Or glazed pottery? The way the bottom is finished it looks more like pottery, unless it's the photo.
  31. It's a horned toad. Betty Manygoats was probably the first to adopt the image, which has become almost a family "signature," although there are other potters from other families as well, such as Alet...
  32. This is contemporary pitch-coated Navajo pottery, made for the tourist/collector market. It is based on the traditional type of all hand-made coiled pottery, made from local clay, fired in an outdoor...
  33. This is actually a traditional type of Mexican basket, from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico, not Hopi or Native American. Although it is coiled, and Second Mesa Hopi baskets are coiled, the ma...
  34. It's a piece of contemporary American-style raku, (post-firing reduction.) It was glazed with a matte glaze before it was fired. The green spot is not a stone, it's either a speck of green gla...
  35. It's a modern interpretation of a Chac Mool figure, from Mesoamerica, associated with the Maya and Aztec cultures. The nearly life-size Pre-Columbian ones have been found at archaeological sites ove...
  36. Not only did they not use potter's wheels (and traditional N.A. potters still don't) but they never used glazes. So the possibility of it being Native American can be eliminated. It has the genera...
  37. It was carved by Tim (Timothy ) Pavatea, not by a woman, so I'm not sure what your reference to the "only woman carver in the nation" is referring to. He is listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Hopi Katsina, ...
  38. Yokuts tribe, central California.
  39. No, not Native American. The Navajo are the only U.S. Native American tribe that weaves rugs, and their weaving is done with a unique type of loom and weaving technique (an upright loom with continuo...
  40. No, it isn't Navajo or Native American. But it was made as an imitation of a Navajo spoon, and probably with the hope buyers would think it was Navajo. Today they are often misrepresented as authenti...
  41. The Hopi pot was made by Treva James Burton, who signs as T. Burton. She was born in 1929 in Oraibi, and learned basket making from her mother in her 20s. After she married, she moved to Tuba City, ...
  42. They are Hopi, but I can't tell you who made them. They date to the first half of the 20th century. by the 1960s/1970s, most potters began signing, with either a hallmark or their name. The jar...
  43. Can't tell you who made them, but they are Hopi, from Arizona, and probably date 1920s to 1960s. The first one could be a little older than the other one, and has a rather unusual design pattern, not...
  44. It's a tom tom, but not Native American. Based on its construction, it's a Chinese tack head tom tom.
  45. Sorry, but no, definitely not the work of Charles Loloma. First, sandpainting is a Navajo practice. Charles Loloma was Hopi. The two tribes are totally unrelated. Traditional sandpainting is a...
  46. Not Native American. It's from Papua New Guinea, in the South Pacific. They are usually referred to as "Buka baskets" for the region of PNG where they originated, but they are now made in the ...
  47. No idea who made it, either, but it's Hopi pottery. Possibly made by a potter who moved into Hopi, since it is made from Hopi clay, fired in a traditional Hopi manner, but the design pattern shows in...
  48. The weaving technique (horizontal or backstrap loom, individually warped, use of soumak stitch decoration) indicate that this is not Native American. The fact that it was woven with fringe on both en...
  49. The lidded one is Yup'ik, from Hooper Bay area of Alaska. The flat one is African, a coiled makenge root basket, from Zambia.
  50. It's Hopi, first half of 20th century, made for the tourist trade. Damage to the surface like this is usually an indication that a former owner exposed it to water. Native American pottery like...
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

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SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.