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  1. Sorry, but this is not Native American. It is a "southwest style" copy, made for the souvenir market, and sold widely in shops, galleries, and trading posts in the Southwest. They are made in Pa...
  2. No, not an authentic pot made by Lucie Rie, IMHO. Form is wrong, signature is wrong, trimmed bottom is wrong, among other things. See the book "Lucie Rie" by Tony Birks, to confirm.
  3. Virtually all pueblo pottery made after the late 1800s was made for sale, to the tourists or collectors. The market kept the traditional crafts alive, and has provided a valuable source of income for...
  4. I really can't tell for sure, other than the "A Mar...."
  5. No, not Native American. It's in the style of Marajoara pottery, a traditional pottery from Brazil. Replicas are still being made today.
  6. There's a name for this: pareidolia. It's a normal human tendency, which some people (including myself) have, some more than others. It means one can see a pattern or image of something that does n...
  7. It is Santo Domingo (now called Kewa) pottery. Kewa Pueblo is an independent, sovereign Indian nation/tribe/pueblo located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was made for the souven...
  8. It is from Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. It is an independent, sovereign Indian nation/tribe/pueblo, located north of Santa Fe. The potter has followed a common way of signing at Jemez, by using on...
  9. But it isn't raku. It's a traditional chicha (a type of fermented drink) bowl, from the Amazon region of South America. There are several neighboring tribes who make very similar pottery, which is...
  10. Not Native American, based on the style. combination of materials, and use of 925, which virtually no Native Americans use. Possibly the work of a professional studio craftsperson.
  11. It's Hopi, from northern Arizona. Probably dates to mid-20th century. The "wear" isn't necessarily an indication or result of age. It apparently has had water damage, causing the loss of slip o...
  12. Not Papago or Native American, nor made from birch or devil's claw. This is actually from the Philippines, made by the Iraya-Mangyan, the indigenous people of Mindoro Island. The material it is ...
  13. It's just the number 883, followed by a very sloppy "Italy." I would doubt if it is "artisan, rare, or handmade," since the "signature" has been repeated to the point it has become almost unrea...
  14. Dan Wheeler has been doing craft fairs and shows all over the country for over 30 years, especially on the west coast, so it's not unusual for his work to show up anywhere. He lives near McMinnvill...
  15. If you are having trouble reading the signature, it is that of Manuel Mora Tena.
  16. There is no tribe involved, it is not Native American. This is Mata Ortiz pottery, named for the village in Mexico where it has been made only since the 1980s None of the potters claim any trib...
  17. Sorry, but this isn't Native American. It is from the Philippines, made from nito, a local vine native to the Philippines. The vine is known for its decorative color range, from light tan to dark b...
  18. Based on the photo, it is Southwest U.S., not Pacific West Coast or First Nations. It's either White Mountain Apache or Pima, depending on the coiling technique used. Both made willow baskets w...
  19. Just some additional points. Chief blankets are woven differently than standard Navajo textiles, with the warp threads running along the shorter measurement rather than the longer measurement. so the...
  20. No tribe, since it's not Native American. This is a typical Mexican souvenir basket, from the Toluca Valley region of central Mexico. The Burke Museum, administered by the University of Washingt...
  21. Thank you for posting this! I have an almost identical vase, same signature, that I've been wondering about for several years. I think I picked it up at the Palmer-Wirf Expo Antique Show in Portlan...
  22. This is a Yekuana basket, from the Amazon region of Venezuela. The distinctive flared shape identifies it as a "wiwa" or vase-shaped basket woven by the women of the tribe. Men weave a different style...
  23. It's African, a banana fiber basket from Uganda.
  24. It's not Native American, it's a typical Mexican basket from the Toluca Valley region of central Mexico. They usually feature images of horses or Native Americans because they were popular souvenir ...
  25. It's a Narino pottery design, from Colombia, South America. Probably not actually pre-Columbian pottery, but based on a Narino pattern. Age can't really be determined from a photo, in this case.
  26. Only one of the baskets is Native American, but it is not from the Northwest, and not related at all to the Coast Salish. The others are Chinese and African. The basket without the lid is Native...
  27. It's likely not going to be possible to figure out the artist. It is souvenir or gift ware, designed for the tourist market, with an "Indian" or "Southwest" style, and is not actually Native American...
  28. It is Hopi pottery, but I am not familiar with who signs with this hallmark. It is similar to Hattie Carl's, but her mark has a flower coming up out of the cloud. There is a Cloud clan at Hopi, ...
  29. As was pointed out already, when items are offered for sale, the legal definition of Native American, given in the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, is what is applied. A dictionary definition is perf...
  30. Definitely not Hopi. Hopi coiled baskets are made only on Second Mesa, and the basket makers are very conservative, never departing from traditional materials and patterns. The are always woven fro...
  31. Not Native American. It appears to be Chorotega pottery, from Costa Rica, based on the dark brown/almost black clay and incised white designs.
  32. I don't think there is any connection with King Kamehameha or with a knife. It appears to be the stopper from an Indonesian lime container.
  33. I agree that it looks like Nayarit pottery, from Mexico. Whether it is actual pre-Columbian, or a more modern pot, I can't say, however. I do wonder about what appears to be a feather inside?
  34. That is most likely going to be difficult, if not impossible, to determine without a signature or country of origin. It's assembled from beads and findings, which could have been made anywhere.
  35. Although it could probably be called "ethnic style," there is nothing at all to indicate that it is Native American, or even made in the United States.
  36. The pendant is may be vaguely Southwest or Native American style, but it is not Native American-made. It's a typical assembled piece, made up of purchased beads and charms, of the type made by co...
  37. I have no idea who made this either, but I do know, positively, that it is not Native American.
  38. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  39. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  40. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  41. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  42. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  43. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  44. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  45. These are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fanciful little figures, which usually c...
  46. All your little animals ("animalitos") are from the Mexican state of Chiapas, made in the Tzeltal Mayan community of Amatenango del Valle, in the east central highlands. They were generally fancifu...
  47. True, it might be newer (but not older) than the early 1900s. The books, instructions, and materials are still available, so it could have been made any time since. The craftsmanship leaves a little...
  48. The combination of materials and weaving techniques are those used by any Native American basket makers. I would suspect it is what is generally called an Arts and Crafts Movement basket. These wer...
  49. This is a little tourist bowl, from Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico. It was decorated with poster-paint, and was a type of low-cost Southwest souvenir from the 1930s to around 1960. Only two pueblos,...
  50. It's Native American, but Isleta, not Zuni. This particular style of pottery was first made in the 1800s, when a small group of people moved from Laguna to Isleta. They brought their Laguna-style p...
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

Hand Carved Wood Old Rabbit Rocker Toy SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.