CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Favorite Categories

Comments

  1. Also a mistake in your identification. This is not an Indian basket. It is African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria. (Also one of the most-commonly misidentified as Native American Indian, if it is ...
  2. Yes, it's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  3. It's a style of blackware done by several potters at San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico, but unusual in that it doesn't have a signature. Is it possible that it could be the lid to a bowl, and the sign...
  4. The design is usually referred to as a deer or antelope. What looks like ears sticking straight up is actually supposed to be the horns. The ears are depicted sticking out to the back, below the hor...
  5. It is from Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico. It was traditionally-made, from local clay, and paints made from local materials. The orangish spots on the white clay are fire clouds, an indication that it was...
  6. It's a contemporary African basket, from the Harar region of eastern Ethiopia.
  7. It's none of those. It's African, a palm fiber basket from Botswana.
  8. Sorry, but they are not Native American. The lidded one with the red and green paint is Chinese. The other lidded one is African, from Ethiopia, and the large oval basket is Mexican, from the Toluca...
  9. That's correct, it is African. It's a Masai beaded neckpiece, from Kenya. Probably made for sale, but certainly in keeping with traditional Masai work. The little discs attached by chains to the be...
  10. It's Yanomami, from the Amazon Basin of Brazil and Venezuela.
  11. It's actually African, a traditional Zulu palm fiber herb basket, from South Africa.
  12. I've seen this work before, but am unfamiliar with exactly who "Jae" is. It appears, however, that this "Jae" signature may refer to Jarvis Antonio. Pottery signed Jarvis Antonio is very similar, ...
  13. The orange V-shaped beak, style of eyes, and wing pattern is typical of the owls made by several Acoma potters, not just Eva Histia. More important, I feel, is that every owl of hers that I've se...
  14. I think you were right on both counts...early 1900s, and Zuni. More complete answer at: http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/231510-can-you-assist-with-identification-pueb?in=1039#comment-1095303
  15. My first thought was Laguna, based on the design patterns. However, it appears that the clay body itself is pinkish, which would indicate Zuni, rather than Acoma or Laguna, which have white clay. ...
  16. I'm afraid this one has too much damage, and is too removed from its original look, to positively identify it based on photos. A determination of where the clay originated is about all that's possibl...
  17. Although San Bartolo Coyotepec has been famous for making black pottery for a lot longer than Mata Ortiz, this particular turtle bowl is definitely Mata Ortiz. Mata Ortiz pottery has only been m...
  18. Timing worked out fine. Right now I'm at a show for the rest of the weekend, so may not be able to check back in here for a couple days.
  19. Found it, and replied in more detail on your new thread. (I think it's early Tesuque.)
  20. I think this one is from Tesuque, based on that triangular design. At least two jars are illustrated in Francis H. Harlow's "Matte-Paint Pottery of the Tewa, Keres and Zuni Pueblos" with that pa...
  21. This is a bowl from Cochiti Pueblo. There are similarities with the pottery of neighboring Santo Domingo (now called Kewa), but the way the birds are depicted is positively Cochiti. The design o...
  22. The Chumash never wove rugs. So you can rule that guess out....
  23. That makes sense!
  24. It's not a type of baby carrier, nor a style of basketry, made by any Native America tribe, so I'd feel safe in eliminating that possibility. I am not familiar with this form, and can't say exactl...
  25. Unless you know the artist's name, and that they are an enrolled member of a specific federally-recognized U.S. tribe, the bowl can't be sold as Native American Indian under the terms of the Indian Ar...
  26. It was thrown and trimmed on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln...which pretty much rules out the possibility that there is any tribal affiliation, since traditional Native American pottery...
  27. No, not Native American. Very well could have been purchased in Arizona, but that doesn't make it Hopi. It's Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. The pottery began ap...
  28. Pamunkey pottery, from the Pamunkey Reservation in Virginia. Not widely known, since there are only about 100 tribal members today. That little band of stick-figure images seems to be one of the sty...
  29. It's typical Isleta, dating late 1890s to ca. 1930. However, this style of pottery was introduced by Laguna potters who moved from Laguna to Isleta in the 1890s, and brought with them the white Lag...
  30. Looks like the remains of someone's meal...a round steak to be exact.
  31. It is African, the lid to a traditional style basket called an agaseke basket, made by the Tutsi, in Rwanda.
  32. ",,,what is a grinding stone arrorhead.." I have no idea what you are asking, or saying?
  33. It's a single-rod, coiled, rattan basket from Lombok, Indonesia. The distinctive rounded basket with the inset lid is a traditional form that has been made in Lombok for years, in several sizes, ...
  34. I realize this post is over 3 years old, but it still shows up on line when one does a search for "Lidia Renteria de Cota" or "Lidia R.C." Even though it is marked as "Solved" and Rosiegirl correctl...
  35. It's Mexican, from the Toluca Valley area, and probably dates ca. 1940s/1950s.
  36. No Navajo baskets here. Despite the claims one reads on line, virtually no Navajo baskets were made between the late 1890s and the 1990s. Religious and cultural restrictions/taboos discouraged wome...
  37. The first one is Pima, from southern Arizona. The other one is from northwestern California. It is most likely Hupa, although there are several other neighboring tribes that make the same type of tw...
  38. And thank you for getting back to us! So often it's never revealed what happens after posting here.
  39. No, wrong on all counts. This is a mola, a type of revese applique needlework, made by the Kuna, of the San Blas Islands of Panama. Originally made as part of the women's traditional blouse, most ...
  40. I would agree, circa 1930s/1940s.
  41. Hopi. Positively.
  42. No Native American tribe uses this combination of material and weaving technique. I would say it is most likely from India, where this technique of creating a design pattern by stitching over several...
  43. A replica or a prop of some sort, or a "decorator" piece. A real one wouldn't be painted, or made from plaster.
  44. It's not Native American. It is from the Philippines, made from a local vine called "nito."
  45. They are recent imports from China. Identified in "Art of the Basket, Contemporary Basketry from Around the World" by Bryan Sentance, as being made from a type of Chinese rush.
  46. It has the general look of some of the Indonesian "tribal style" sculpture being exported over the last couple decades...but I have never seen something exactly like this....
  47. It's African, a Masai beaded bracelet.
  48. No, definitely not Native American! I've seen this type of item before, it appears to be some type of kitsch souvenir caricature of tribal art. It may be from Indonesia, someplace in Africa, or ...
  49. This is a nkisi nkondi, sometimes translated as a "power figure," a traditional part of the Kongo culture. Whether or not this particular piece is "real," depends on how you define that. Was i...
  50. No, not Native American. The Navajo are the only Native American tribe that weaves rugs, and their weaving is identified not by the designs (since most of their design patterns actually originated in...
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED. Possibly a Native American Woven Basket