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  1. It's from the Darien Rainforest in Panama, made by the Wounaan or nieghboring Embera people. The baskets are made from Chunga palm leaves, stitched over coils made from the nahuala plant.
  2. Well, I learned that some people don't realize that "maked" isn't a word!
  3. Not sure what you mean. I've never heard the term "maked on the spot" used in any field, art or otherwise.
  4. This is traditional Navajo pottery, from the Cow Springs area of the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. It is hand-coiled from local clay, dried, and fired in a wood bonfire. While it is still hot afte...
  5. It is contemporary (1980s to the present) pottery from the village of Mata Ortiz in northern Chihuahua, like two of the other pots you posted about. This one shows the influence of design pattern...
  6. Not early 1900s, but it is Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz. Same as the other pot you posted about: https://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/264294-love-this-piece--anybody-know-its-origi?in...
  7. It's Mata Ortiz pottery, named for the village of Mata Ortiz in northern Chihuahua, where it is made. It's considered Contemporary Art Pottery by the Mexican government. The potter, David Ortiz, i...
  8. Just in the interest of accuracy, to potters (especially in Japan) there is a distinction between "nerikomi' and "neriage," although the two are often confused. "Neri" is the Japanese root word ...
  9. Possibly Indian, as in India, but there is definitely not any connection with Native American Indian, or war paint. Clear, non-fuzzy, photos would help identify where exactly it came from, but Na...
  10. It probably came from Mexico. It's not Native American, since the Navajo are the only U.S. tribe that weaves rugs, and they use a unique type of loom and weaving technique that identifies their w...
  11. Is it actually glass? Or glazed pottery? The way the bottom is finished it looks more like pottery, unless it's the photo.
  12. It's a horned toad. Betty Manygoats was probably the first to adopt the image, which has become almost a family "signature," although there are other potters from other families as well, such as Alet...
  13. This is contemporary pitch-coated Navajo pottery, made for the tourist/collector market. It is based on the traditional type of all hand-made coiled pottery, made from local clay, fired in an outdoor...
  14. This is actually a traditional type of Mexican basket, from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico, not Hopi or Native American. Although it is coiled, and Second Mesa Hopi baskets are coiled, the ma...
  15. It's a piece of contemporary American-style raku, (post-firing reduction.) It was glazed with a matte glaze before it was fired. The green spot is not a stone, it's either a speck of green gla...
  16. It's a modern interpretation of a Chac Mool figure, from Mesoamerica, associated with the Maya and Aztec cultures. The nearly life-size Pre-Columbian ones have been found at archaeological sites ove...
  17. Not only did they not use potter's wheels (and traditional N.A. potters still don't) but they never used glazes. So the possibility of it being Native American can be eliminated. It has the genera...
  18. It was carved by Tim (Timothy ) Pavatea, not by a woman, so I'm not sure what your reference to the "only woman carver in the nation" is referring to. He is listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Hopi Katsina, ...
  19. Yokuts tribe, central California.
  20. No, not Native American. The Navajo are the only U.S. Native American tribe that weaves rugs, and their weaving is done with a unique type of loom and weaving technique (an upright loom with continuo...
  21. No, it isn't Navajo or Native American. But it was made as an imitation of a Navajo spoon, and probably with the hope buyers would think it was Navajo. Today they are often misrepresented as authenti...
  22. The Hopi pot was made by Treva James Burton, who signs as T. Burton. She was born in 1929 in Oraibi, and learned basket making from her mother in her 20s. After she married, she moved to Tuba City, ...
  23. They are Hopi, but I can't tell you who made them. They date to the first half of the 20th century. by the 1960s/1970s, most potters began signing, with either a hallmark or their name. The jar...
  24. Can't tell you who made them, but they are Hopi, from Arizona, and probably date 1920s to 1960s. The first one could be a little older than the other one, and has a rather unusual design pattern, not...
  25. It's a tom tom, but not Native American. Based on its construction, it's a Chinese tack head tom tom.
  26. Sorry, but no, definitely not the work of Charles Loloma. First, sandpainting is a Navajo practice. Charles Loloma was Hopi. The two tribes are totally unrelated. Traditional sandpainting is a...
  27. Not Native American. It's from Papua New Guinea, in the South Pacific. They are usually referred to as "Buka baskets" for the region of PNG where they originated, but they are now made in the ...
  28. No idea who made it, either, but it's Hopi pottery. Possibly made by a potter who moved into Hopi, since it is made from Hopi clay, fired in a traditional Hopi manner, but the design pattern shows in...
  29. The weaving technique (horizontal or backstrap loom, individually warped, use of soumak stitch decoration) indicate that this is not Native American. The fact that it was woven with fringe on both en...
  30. The lidded one is Yup'ik, from Hooper Bay area of Alaska. The flat one is African, a coiled makenge root basket, from Zambia.
  31. It's Hopi, first half of 20th century, made for the tourist trade. Damage to the surface like this is usually an indication that a former owner exposed it to water. Native American pottery like...
  32. I'd say either Tesuque, or Cochiti, leaning more toward the latter. Early 1900s-1920s. Unusual shape for a cup, possibly an attempt at a double-spouted pitcher, common at neighboring Santo Doming...
  33. I would think more likely Cochiti, based on the clay color, and design patterns. Circa 1920s.
  34. It's a coiled palm fiber basket, made in Pakistan.
  35. They look like typical Bennington marbles, made in Germany in the 1800s. There were also a few U.S. companies that made similar clay marbles. They're made from clay, fired and salt-glazed in a k...
  36. It's probably just a fantasy item. I've never seen any authentic Native American (NW Coast, or otherwise), that looked anything like this. NW Indians weren't known for using alabaster, it's not fo...
  37. It's a traditional chicha (a type of fermented drink) bowl, from the Amazon region of Ecuador. There are several neighboring tribes who make very similar pottery, which is difficult to distingui...
  38. Just a word of warning. I wouldn't rely on the internet in "researching" this. Yazzie is a very common name among the Navajo. There is no one Yazzie family, there are many, and unrelated. Barton W...
  39. It's Navajo, but not Teec Nos Pos. That style originated in the area around the trading post of Teec Nos Pos, in northeastern Arizona, on the Navajo reservation, but it is characterized by intricate ...
  40. Not Native American, it's actually African. This is a traditional Moroccan palm fiber bread basket, identified by the unique braided rim finish, the material used, the colors used, and the design...
  41. Some are signed, a lot are not. But the distinctive rounded body style is typical of this type of Chulucanas pottery.
  42. It's a Chulucanas pottery figure, from Peru, if that is any help. Chulucanas is a town in northwestern Peru, famous for its pottery. It's contemporary, however, not 1950s/1960s.
  43. It's a fan, but not Indian. It's a traditional style fan from Micronesia, probably the Marshall Islands, based on the type of woven handle and the way it's attached.
  44. No tribe. They're Mexican, mid to late 20th century, popular souvenir items.
  45. It isn't Native American. This is a Mexican basket, from the Toluca Valley region of central Mexico. In its present condition, it really has only sentimental value.
  46. Sorry, but this isn't an authentic Inuit item, even though it looks like one. There were several Seattle companies, dating back to the early 1900s, that produced souvenirs for the Alaska market, incl...
  47. Yes, it's pottery, but I'd say she is Mexican, rather than Native American Indian. Possibly Oaxaca
  48. In my opinion, the writing on the bottom decreases, rather than adds to the value, which is usually the case when a former owner has decided to add their (usually inaccurate) notations of thoughts/mem...
  49. All I can tell you is that it is definitely not Native American.
  50. Your first impression was correct. They are Mexican, 1940's/1950's. Typical burnished and painted pots made in Tonala, state of Jalisco, for the tourist trade. Amanda Thompson's "Ceramica, Mexican ...
  51. See more

Loves

Crie Prophecy,  XIX Century MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

SCAREY SANTO DOMINGO NATIVE ART, VOODOO MONKEY?-ARTIST SIGNED.