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Steam Pressure Gauges

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Posted 2 years ago

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antiquecol…
(16 items)

These are some of my Steam Pressure Gauge Collection.
12” Wm. Bros Boiler & Mfg. Co., 8” Schaeffer & Budenberg, 10” Kewanee (Made into a Clock), 6” Wm. Bros Boiler & Mfg. Co.

Comments

  1. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Neat collection-- do you have information on what they each went on originally?

    scott
  2. antiquecollector antiquecollector, 2 years ago
    All these Gauges were on Steam Boilers. The 0 - 30 PSI Gauges were on Low Pressure Boilers. The 0 - 200 & 300 PSI Gauges were on High Pressure Boilers.
  3. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Is there a way to tell what the boiler went to? Locomotive, industrial, etc...

    scott
  4. antiquecollector antiquecollector, 2 years ago
    All these gauges were taken off boilers used to heat buildings. I was in the Plumbing and Heating business. The Steam Gauge used on a Locomotive or piece of steam machinery would be the same. All mechanical gauges use a Bourdon Tube to measure the steam pressure. (Google Bourdon Tube to learn about this) Usually when used on a piece of machinery such as a steam tractor, piece of machinery or locomotive, the machinery company would have the gauge manufacture put their company name on the gauge for advertisement. The 12" Bros Gauge was used on a Bros Boiler and the Gauge was manufactured by the Ashcroft Mfg. Co. maker of Ashcroft Gauges.
  5. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks for the information-- any idea on a Boston Steam Gauge Company product with a "Stereoptican and Film Exchange" would have been used for?

    Here is my posting:

    http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/82277-interesting-steam-gauge-with-original-bo?in=user

    Thanks for any information you may be able to provide.

    scott
  6. antiquecollector antiquecollector, 2 years ago
    I'm familiar with the American Steam Gauge Company. The words “STEREOPTICAN AND FILM EXCHANGE” on the gauge is interesting. I googled those words and came to the conclusion it had to do with processing of glass film plates or processing photographic film around the turn of the century. I would guess that this gauge was on some sort of water filter or water system used in the process of the film. Because the glass is beveled and the case is chrome my guess that it is a pressure gauge used to determine water pressure and not steam pressure. Beveled glass and chrome finishing are generally used for water. Most steam gauge manufactures make gauges for water, steam, and vacuum. Beveled glass and chrome tells me its for water. What is confusing is that the range is 0 – 250 PSI. Water pressures average 50 – 80 PSI. Most engineers prefer the gauge to read in the middle of the scale. If you had a water pressure of 50 PSI you would want a gauge that read 0 – 100 PSI. Low pressure steam is 15 PSI and under so you would want a Steam gauge to read 0 – 30 PSI. It is possible that if this gauge was used in a water purification system for plate development, it might have contained a pump and therefor develop a pressure of 125 PSI or so. The pump would be used to move the water through the filter and processing tank. Maybe this gauge was on a piece of film developing equipment. I would guess that this gauge dates around 1900 or less. The word “Steam” in the name American Steam Gauge Company does not necessarily mean it is a steam gauge. Its just their company name. Looking at the pigtail on your gauge (Second Photo) there appears to be a brass fitting and copper connection above it. This material would generally be used for water. Even the wood box would tell me it's 1900 or less. What's that other fitting in the wood box? What's written on the tag?
  7. scottvez scottvez, 2 years ago
    Thanks so much for your thoughts collector.

    I will post the items from the box later today.

    scott

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