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SALESMAN'S DEMONSTRATOR -AUTOMATIC DRIVEWAY GATE

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PATENT MODELS & SALESMAN S…57 of 89SALESMAN SAMPLE FOR AN ADJUSTABLE GATE POSTTUMBLEDOWN STILE - SOUVENIR
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    Posted 6 years ago

    TheGateKee…
    (202 items)

    34" x 19" x 10" Salesman's Demonstrator of an automatic driveway gate.
    Folds up to 19" x 4" x 10" for easier transport.

    I have not found any patent information for this gate or for the one on the right sold in a past auction. My number one theory is that it is a variation of patent no. 811,371, January 30, 1906 issued to Isaac Burkholder, of Dayton, Ohio, one half of which was assigned to Charles N. Heist, of Cissnapark, Illinois. Number two theory is that they were too similar to the Burkholder patent and were not patented. Makes you wonder why they would go to the expense of making Salesman's Samples. Do you suppose there was patent infringement? You may see the Burkholder model in another of my postings.

    March 16, 2014. Patent found! My gut said it was a Burkholder gate, and it is, but not the same Isaac Burkholder of Dayton, Ohio. This patent was issued to Isaac Burkholder, of Farmersville, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1888, patent no. 377,479. The model is an updated version of the patent but all the patented features are there. Looks like patent no 811,371 is maybe a family member, and the patent is an improvement of this patent.

    Mystery Solved

    Comments

    1. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 6 years ago
      The last two pictures appear to be copied from the Internet and the first two don't seem to be well focused. Speaking only about the first two pictures, the rope and lead weight will help you identify age if they are original (which I doubt) the weave and stitching on the rope will date it. Believe it or not there are databases just for that purpose. The core, sheath and stitching all play into it and all have different life expectancies. The gate may have been a proto type which would explain no patent although it could just as easily be a reproduction. I assume it has been cleaned because there is no patina on the weight. The other hardware on this is not visible but may be of help in identifying the period.
    2. TheGateKeeper TheGateKeeper, 6 years ago
      Thanks for your input fhfjr. Your comments about the quality of the first two photos is well taken. I have been unable to find a suitable spot with enough light to take pictures. Have experimented with various settings and backgrounds. Have a long way to go. As for the rope it is definitely not original. Made of woven nylon. There were no weights when I received it. I added the steel fishing weights. The other brass and metal hardware is original to the piece. Reproductions are a reality in every venue of collecting. I adhere to the "representative of the patent" mantra. The historical value of a piece is my motivation.

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