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Antique Native American?? What is this?

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Native American Antiques1063 of 1841Native American Scraper found in South KYSTERLING SILVER NATIVE AMERICAN LAPIS LAZULI NECKLACE MARKED 970
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    Posted 7 years ago

    Babyblues
    (3 items)

    Can anyone help me identify the origin of this piece (the one in the photo on the right) ? I think it is antique Native American but am not sure.

    Thank you. If you know anything I'd really appreciate it.

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    Comments

    1. CanyonRoad, 7 years ago
      This is contemporary Mexican pottery from Mata Ortiz, northern Chihuahua. This type of pottery was first made and came on the market in the late 1970's/1980's. The early pieces were copies of, or influenced by, ancient Casas Grandes Indian pottery, from the nearby Paquime ruins, which explains why the pottery looks old.

      The Casas Grandes culture disappeared in 1450 AD. In the 1970's, a Mata Ortiz farmer, Juan Quezada, succeeded in teaching himself how to make pottery by studying the old Indian pottery shards found in the area. His pottery was "discovered" by a U.S. anthropologist, who encouraged him to make more, and who arranged shows for his work. Quezada then taught his family and neighbors how to make pottery, and today there are some 400 potters in the village.

      It is a modern success story. Most potters are now making their own designs and patterns, but still are hand-building the pots like they learned from Juan. The potters are Mexican, not Native American, and the pottery is now considered contemporary Mexican Art Pottery.

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