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Old Axe

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curtisfiore's items7 of 18Antique Lancashire Pattern HacksawWestern Electric 20-H (Frankenstein)
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    Posted 7 years ago

    curtisfiore
    (18 items)

    I'm looking for information on this old axe. I found it in a barn (mid-70s) outside of Cleveland Ohio. It looks hand made, flat on one side. Is that pattern common? Any Idea of when or were it was made? Anything at all is appreciated?

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    Comments

    1. fortapache fortapache, 7 years ago
      It's a trade ax. That one has the hammer back preferred by settlers (they just have cable you know). Probably early 1800s as they were hand made.

      http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/167180-antique-trade-axe-tomahawk-circa-early1

      That one is mine. There are several links in the comments section with interesting information.
    2. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 7 years ago
      I thought the flat sided ones were for making wood shingles.
    3. curtisfiore, 7 years ago
      Thank you. I will take a look at trade axes to see if I can find anything similar.
    4. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 7 years ago
      Look up Fuchs hatchets, shingling hatchets & flat-back hatchets.
    5. BHock45 BHock45, 7 years ago
      I do not believe it is a trade ax. I think this is a broad ax, or as blunder was saying, a hewing hatchet. These axes were only beveled on one side, like a chisel. They were used to cut square beams for barns or split rail fences. One side should be entirely flat.

      So looks like yours is hand forged, Very nice ax, I am going to look at my tool book and see if I can ID the form, it is not like the typical broad axes we see on the east coast here. And the poll is rather large.
    6. BHock45 BHock45, 7 years ago
      early 19th century.
    7. BHock45 BHock45, 7 years ago
      compare to this ax head which was dug here in NJ.

      http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/135650-early-american-hewing-hatchet-head-loo
    8. curtisfiore, 7 years ago
      Thanks again for all the comments. So possibly a hewing hatchet, early 1800s, imported or made in Ohio? At some point I would like to donate it to a museum if it has any significant historic value.
    9. BHock45 BHock45, 7 years ago
      These were heavily used tools... I doubt the handle is original although old. Usually they had a curved handle so the user wouldn't slam his knuckles on the log. There were different shapes for different regions.

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