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North west wondering

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    Posted 6 years ago

    BelleChamb…
    (4 items)

    I am assuming this is Salish, correct anyone? Large, 16" long, 5" high, 10" wide. Perfect condition , tightly woven, black imbracation. Anyone?

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    BEAUTIFUL DECORATIVE ENGLISH ANTIQUE 1895 SOLID STERLING SILVER TEA CANISTER BOX
    BEAUTIFUL DECORATIVE ENGLISH ANTIQU...
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    Comments

    1. ho2cultcha ho2cultcha, 6 years ago
      i don't know, but it's beautiful!
    2. CanyonRoad, 6 years ago
      Sorry, but no, this is not Salish or Native American Indian. Nor is the black design imbrication.

      This is a contemporary import from Bali, Indonesia. It's made from woven rattan, not the cedar that a Salish basket would be made from.

      Imbrication is a specific type of stitch, where the imbricated material is folded under the coiling stitch, running perpendicular to the coil. It creates a look that is often compared to kernels of corn on a cob.

      If you'd like a reference, here is a good website from the Burke Museum, about Salish basketry, which illustrates and describes the imbrication stitch, as well as the materials and techniques used: http://www.burkemuseum.org/static/baskets/Teachersguideforbasketry.htm

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