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Old Bottle with lables of "Golden Wedding Whiskey". . . For Medicinal Purposes Only :^)

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    Posted 2 years ago

    billretire…
    (384 items)

    When I first saw this Full Pint bottle, that was in a felt shoe bag, at the Flea Market, I thought it was just a new empty bottle, until I saw the tax stamp Fall 1917, and the "Exclusive Feature" banner pointing to the "Turn To Break Pilfer Proof Cap". There's several different dates on the bottle making it hard to figure when it was actually bottled, the dates are: "Since 1856", "16 years in wood", "Produced Prior To September 8th, 1917" , "Pat. Applied For Nov. 28th 1924", "For 50 Years", "Act of Congress March 3, 1897", "Act Approved February 17, 1922", but the odd one was the tax seal that had the date of "Fall 1917", on a bottle that was made after 1924.
    The Bottle looks great, with the Carnival Glass Marigold iridescent color, and clear labels, and I love the "For Medicinal Purposes Only"! :^D

    Thank you for looking, any comments, of info. welcome! :^)

    Comments

    1. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Thank you for a look, and some love, Bonnie! :^)
    2. SpiritBear, 2 years ago
      Most likely:
      They've been around since 1856.
      Prohibition was written in 1917 though not nationally enacted till 1918.
      Your alcohol was made and taxed in 1917.
      Not sure on the 1922 aspect.
      The bottle, of course, has its patent circa 1924, though its product has been aged for 16 years, so it could be as new as the end of Prohibition. Medical whiskey was still allowed during Prohibition.
      Most collectors don't like screw-top bottles, though. They look too modern. But it's an interesting conversation piece.
    3. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Thanks for your comment SpiritBear, I was mostly being silly, about all the dates, it had to be after 1924, but I really liked the bottle glass itself, and the condition at over 90 years old, when I first thought it may have been just 9! :^D
      The fact that the new Pilfer Proof screw top, is marked, I think adds to it's collectability! :^)
    4. SpiritBear, 2 years ago
      In the bottle world, I'm afraid not. Screw-caps tend to be avoided. But, as an earlier screw-cap, it makes a nice conversation piece. Don't put it in direct sunlight or under bright lights for any period of time. The label is in very good condition and should remain so.
    5. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Thanks SpiritBear, I'm keeping it in the felt shoe bag, that I found it in! :^)
    6. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Here's an interesting post for Golden Wedding Whiskey:

      http://pre-prowhiskeymen.blogspot.com/2015/01/

      Some good info about it and the labeling of the time! :^)
    7. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Here's a little bit from it:

      They soon trademarked Golden Wedding a second time under the newer and tighter patent laws.  Sometime in the 1910s the Johnsons ceased distilling.  The property was then sold to Sol Rosenbloom who in turn sold the distillery in 1920 to Lewis Rosensteil.  He was the founder of the Schenley Corporation who had acquired a number of distilleries, brand names, and a large stock of whiskey before and during National Prohibition.   With his purchase of the Finch properties, Rosensteil is reported to have obtained 500,000 gallons of Golden Wedding whiskey and a “concentration warehouse” permit from the Federal Government.  That permitted him to sell labeled Golden Wedding whiskey during Prohibition to customers with a physician’s prescription.  A “medicinal” bottle is shown here.  Able to keep the brand name before the public during the 13 “dry” years, in 1935 Schenley reintroduced the brand as a minimally-aged blend.  A post-Prohibition label is shown here, still with Finch’s name attached.  Later Golden Wedding would become a Canadian product and as late as 1987 was being sold as a low cost, low quality whiskey.  

      The post has a lot more! :^)
    8. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Hi Kevin, thanks for the love! :^)
    9. SpiritBear, 2 years ago
      There is no harm in displaying it. I have moved most of my labeled antique bottles to a cupboard I can close off from all light and open at will.
    10. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Thanks Thomas, and SpiritBear, for your comments! :^D
      Thomas, I was going to post this for info from SpiritBear, and he came through!
      SpiritBear, I would, if I could, but I can't! :^D I'd need about 5000 sq. foot of floor space, full of cabinets, and shelves, just to get a good start at displaying, these treasures! :^)

      Thank you much Thomas for the love! :^)
    11. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Thank you both fortapache, and JImam, for stopping by for a look, and leaving some love! :^)

      Talkin about love, the bottle still has the smell of whiskey! Kinda makes my mouth water! :^Q mmm
    12. aphonik aphonik, 2 years ago
      This Golden Wedding was made in 1917, then aged for 16 years (an unusually long time thanks to the advent of National Prohibition in 1920) and bottled in 1933, just before repeal in December of 1933. Medicinal bottles like this were sold throughout the dry years from 1920-1933, and one needed a prescription from a medical doctor to purchase them. Cheers, --Eric ewitz@comcast.net
    13. billretirecoll billretirecoll, 2 years ago
      Thank you aphonic, for your comment, and information, much appreciated! :^)

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