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Kings Crown Carnival Blue Iridescent Candy Footed Compot

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Posted 3 years ago

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SILKY7477
(7 items)

THIS HAS BEEN IN MY FAMILY FOREVER I DON'T EVEN KNOW HOW IT SURVIVED ALL THE MOVES WE MADE ITS EITHER A CANDY DISH OR GOBLET

Mystery Solved

Comments

  1. Hedgewalker Hedgewalker, 3 years ago
    This is beautiful but I don't know who made it.I will keep an eye out.But I have to say don't get hung up on Fenton.Fenton made beautiful glass but there are a lot of other glass companies that made really gorgeus pieces also.Take a look around this site you will see plenty of glass that will impress you.You may even find this piece.
  2. SILKY7477 SILKY7477, 3 years ago
    THANK YOU!
  3. Hedgewalker Hedgewalker, 3 years ago
    Hey SILKY check out this link.

    http://carolinabluelady.auctivacommerce.com/Kings-Crown-Carnival-Blue-Iridescent-Candy-Footed-Compote--P336374.aspx
  4. SILKY7477 SILKY7477, 3 years ago
    WOW! YOUR GOOD! DARN! I HAVE A SMALL JAR WITH POINTY LID AS WELL MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BY SAME THANK SO MUCH I WILL EDIT THE NAME.
  5. TallCakes TallCakes, 3 years ago
    It is called a compote or comport. The pattern was originated by Adams and Co. in 1891, and was named Excelsior or X.L.C.R. This pattern was later reproduced by U. S. Glass under the new name of 'Kings Crown' and continued by Tiffin when they took over U. S. Glass and changed the name. The pattern was also reproduced by Indiana Glass from 1950s-1990s. I think yours is most likely the Indiana Glass version as they were the one how made the wider range of colored glass.

    http://indianaglass.carnivalheaven.com/id258.htm
  6. TallCakes TallCakes, 3 years ago
    BTW it's not necessary to say footed compote, as all compotes are footed; so it's a bit redundant
  7. SILKY7477 SILKY7477, 3 years ago
    I AM SO NEW TO THIS AND SO GRATEFUL FOR ALL THE HELP AND COMMENTS THANK YOU HOW ABOUT MY BLACK WEDDING VASE KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT THAT?
  8. TallCakes TallCakes, 3 years ago
    you'll see from the pictures on the Indiana site that they actually named their pattern "Early American Crown and Thumbprint" and pattern #77. One in your color is also there and they called it 'Blue Carnival" glass.
  9. SILKY7477 SILKY7477, 3 years ago
    THANK YOU!
  10. Paul71 Paul71, 3 years ago
    When Tiffin began making this pattern in the 1940s they called it "Dubonnet" for a short time. Then it was called King's Crown. To add more to the mix, Tiffin called it "Antique Thumbprint" when offered in transparent colors (Plum, Banana Yellow, Empire Green)
    The factory located at Tiffin, OH was one of the member factories of USGCo (Factory R) that managed to survive. USGCo offices, located in Pittsburgh, PA, were transfered to Tiffin in the late 30s. The company was still called the United States Glass Company up until the early 1960s.
  11. wolcott1, 3 years ago
    Thanks for posting and thanks to Hedgewalker and Tallcakes for the info! I have the same one and never had any info about it. It's a pretty little thing isn't it Silky?
  12. wolcott1, 3 years ago
    Thanks to Paul71 as well!

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