Paul71

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Paul71

Personal Website: musicbypaulkirk.webs.com

Musician and glass researcher, author, and historian.

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  1. Welcome!
  2. Welcome, Luna, Bryce, Higbee's Banquet was actually introduced in 1897. It is first mentioned in trade journal reports in late 1896, but was a pattern for the Spring 1897 market.
  3. You are welcome. I have trade journal reports and ads when the pattern was new, and I'm pretty sure it was introduced in 1902. Many online sources do not have correct information. The most definit...
  4. Pearl, It's pressed glass rather than cut. The pattern was made by the Riverside Glass Company around 1906/07. They called it Aurora. Shortly after, the company went out of business. Moulds were acq...
  5. Bees, Not lead crystal, but good quality glass. This is George Duncan's Sons & Company's No. 30 pattern, more commonly referred to as "Scalloped Six Point" by collectors. Awful name, really, because...
  6. This is Lancaster Glass Company's little-known No. 917 pattern dating from the early 1900s. It is a copy of McKee's popular Aztec pattern. Company catalogs I have show a cracker jar, and bowls are sh...
  7. That's Cambridge Glass Company's No. 2626, Radium.
  8. Hi Luna, These are Bryce, Higbee's Banquet pattern. If you are interested in Bryce, Higbee glass (or other EAPG, for that matter), you might want to take a look at my book, which will be available...
  9. The only item of AH's Moonstone in the photos is the large ruffled plate.
  10. Welcome, WW
  11. It's marigold carnival; the pattern is known as "Feathered Arrow" maker unknown. Once thought to be Millersburg, but that has proven untrue.
  12. Need to know the height to tell you if it's the spoon or celery, Robin. The Homestead spoon is about 6" tall. Celery is 7" + .
  13. USGCo. cataloged this as a "Whiskey Tumbler." The true toothpick is fatter and has a scalloped edge. It was also sold as a "Toy Spoon." These entries are from the company's 1898 catalog.
  14. Thanks, Don, hope you've been well. I have more information for you on Silcon, No. 1900, etc. If you want you can email me directly.
  15. Would help, too, if we knew the size. There is a No. 1900 4" square nappy which has 5 panels on each side; the 4" Masonic "Square Dish" (per original catalog) has 8 panels on each side. Tom Felt aske...
  16. In the catalog, Indiana's does not appear flared. I could not tell from your photos, but just enlarged them and appears yours is flared. I look through the posts now and then and click on the thum...
  17. Not many people realize that Indiana also made this set as well as another Duncan pattern known as "Bassettown." Indiana called it "Saratoga." The quality of these sets is better than what is usually ...
  18. McKee's various Innovation lines were introduced in the teens. It was an "innovation" because it was relatively inexpensive pressed glass with cutting on the flower petals and highlights in the design...
  19. Keep in mind Indiana Glass Company also made this set and called it "Duchess." It appears in their 1978 catalog.
  20. The frame is Electroplated Nickel Silver. Pattern is McKee's Masonic (or USGCo.'s No. 1900--essentially the same pattern). Often found in plated frames like this. Could be used for just about anything...
  21. Welcome, glad to know the history and information is appreciated.
  22. Welcome, Gruff. Happy Sunday to you, too. It's nice when people appreciate the glass and the history behind it.
  23. Fenton did, indeed, make this pattern in green, among other colors. Incidentally, they called it "Priscilla" because that is what collectors at the time called the pattern, but the name given by the o...
  24. Thatcher Glass also made these sets in the same pattern in clear and milk white. They called it "Yorktown" The glass if often grainy and had a gray cast.
  25. LG, your information is pretty much correct. "Waterlily and Cattails" is said to be one of the first patterns Fenton made. They began in 1905, but only as a decorating company. They did not begin to p...
  26. Silver plate mfgrs. purchased items from glass companies and fitted them with lids, frames, etc and sold them as their own product. Glass "biscuit jars" with metal lids are shown in original catalogs ...
  27. JF, the pattern is known as "Christmas Pearls" and presumed to be by Jefferson Glass Company (I do not recall ever seeing catalog proof). Dates to the early 1900s. I believe it also comes in opalescen...
  28. THV, your stand was not part of the sets which were reproduced. This stand was originally sold with a deep 10" bowl called an orange bowl by the company, as well as a flared 12" punch bowl (ref: USGCo...
  29. Yes, Gruff, it is old. The pattern was introduced in 1899; it's McKee's Stars and Stripes and that's what they originally called it. Original catalog lists it simply as "Triangle Dish" so there is no...
  30. Update: My book, Homestead Glass Works: Bryce, Higbee & Company 1879-1907 will be available Spring 2016. It will show up in Schiffer's next catalog, so keep an eye out for it.
  31. Your bowl is McKee's Rotec, Stra. This pattern was part of McKee's Prescut series. Rotec was introduced sometime around 1910. You'll see an 1894 date attached to this and other Prescut patterns, but t...
  32. Welcome, DLG.
  33. I've known it to be Bryce, Higbee & Company for quite some time :)
  34. Serendipity--was just looking through a Spring 1905 Butler Brothers catalog for something else for a friend and spotted Imperial's No. 282 pattern in an assortment, so it goes back at least to Spring ...
  35. Not EAPG, it's Val St. Lambert, Belgium. Not quite as early as true lacy glass, but nice nonetheless.
  36. This is Imperial Glass Company's No. 248 pattern, better known to collectors as "Rococo." Dates c. 1910.
  37. Imperial's No. 282 was actually made before their Nucut line was introduced c. 1911. Most sources date No. 282 to 1909, but I first spot the pattern in an October 1908 Butler Brothers catalog. Some it...
  38. Update: manuscript was received by the publisher 4/3/15 and now we being "round 2."
  39. There has been a lot of incorrect things written about Bryce, Higbee & Company, J. B. Higbee, and their products. Stay tuned for my book on Bryce, Higbee & Company that Schiffer will be publishing. I ...
  40. Actually, this is US Glass Company's Dunmoyle pattern introduced in the early to mid-1920s. Bartlett Collins did copy this pattern (or possibly got USGCo.'s moulds---but doubtful and no evidence of th...
  41. Rest assured FG, the company intended this to be a honey dish. It appears in a ca. 1912 Co-Operative Flint Glass Co. catalog as "Honey and Cover." The original name the company gave the pattern is For...
  42. Ruby stained items of Bellaire are later-made reissues by Imperial; this was not part of the original production of the pattern.
  43. Laurie, it is nice to have a complete table set as you do: cream, covered sugar, spoon holder, and covered butter. As long as the shelf is wide enough and you can see them to enjoy, they should be fin...
  44. Those flowers are engraved rather than etched.
  45. Welcome, Bob.
  46. Not sure why you think the P&G photo is the exterior of the Good Luck bowl, Don. It is a separate bowl, and the pattern is on the interior.
  47. Welcome, FF. Northwood's Good Luck comes in a huge array of colors and varieties. Some have stippling within the pattern; back is usually ribbed or a basketweave pattern, but some are found with plain...
  48. Check that mark again, because this is hammered aluminum. Sterling would not be riveted like that. This is a bon bon dish. Glass insert is Jeannette Glass Company's "Thumbprint" pattern. These types o...
  49. Pattern is called Shell or Seashell by collectors, maker unknown. Circa late 1870s-1880s. That is an engraving rather than an etching.
  50. Remember, the Roundup name was coined by early authors (in this case, Hartung, I believe). In the early 1900s when this was made, things exotic were quite popular. This was some designer's fanciful i...
  51. See more

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