Share your favorites on Show & Tell

Hebrew or Yiddish Typewriter

In Office > Typewriters > Show & Tell.
Typewriters109 of 272Underwood 1915? Standard Portable Typewriter in Green Faux Bois: Have questions!Triumph Grundig Personal Typewriter
4
Love it
0
Like it

musikchoomusikchoo loves this.
BelltownBelltown loves this.
aghcollectaghcollect loves this.
JewelsJewels loves this.
See 2 more
Add to collection

    Please create an account, or Log in here

    If you don't have an account, create one here.


    Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate



    Posted 5 years ago

    BarbWiseberg
    (1 item)

    I bought this typewriter last week - I may have paid too much but it "spoke" to me.....

    It’s a Remington typewriter but I am not sure if the letters are Hebrew or Yiddish. Hebrew has 22 characters on their keyboard but this has more. The letters on five of the original keys seem to have been replaced – the original ones are all black and these five are white.

    It comes with a black cover that fits over the whole unit.

    I am not sure if this is the serial number, but the number I see, right above the top row of keys, on the right hand side, is V677486.

    Unsolved Mystery

    Help us close this case. Add your knowledge below.

    Comments

    1. SSBN641, 5 years ago
      Hi. If you lift off the ribbon cover near the carriage roller, and look on the frame itself towards the keyboard, I believe you'll find both the year/month of manufacture and the serial number. It may not be obvious at first, so use a flashlight and a magnifying glass. I'm betting this is a late 20's or early 30's vintage.
      And yes, I believe those are Hebrew characters, but I'm not an expert so you'd better verify.
    2. yiddishmentsh, 4 years ago
      Hey there! I'm definitely no expert (or even novice) on typewriters, but I can tell you this is almost certainly a Yiddish, not a Hebrew typewriter. There are 3 keys that make me think that. There is a dedicated key for tsvey vovn (?), tsvey yudn (?), and komets alef (??). It appears (though I can't quite tell) that one of the replacement keys is a pasekh alef (??). These four letters are all used extremely commonly in Yiddish, but would not be considered separate letters or used very often in Hebrew. Also, the fact that these are the only accented letters included suggests that this typewriter was manufactured after the language was standardized by YIVO. So I'd say the very, very earliest this could have been manufactured would have been 1926, but it is likely much later than that, I would guess post-1937 (see this article for more information on the standardization of the language: http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Language/Planning_and_Standardization_of_Yiddish ). This is a very interesting piece!

    Want to post a comment?

    Create an account or login in order to post a comment.